Manichaeism in Mesopotamia and the Roman East

Manichaeism in Mesopotamia and the Roman East

Manichaeism in Mesopotamia and the Roman East

Manichaeism in Mesopotamia and the Roman East

Excerpt

This volume contains one hitherto unpublished monograph article (Article II) and a selection of five of my articles which, with the exception of IV, deal mainly with the history of Manichaeism in the Eastern Roman Empire. The reasons for including a hitherto unpublished article in a volume of collected studies are given in the introductory note to the article. The seemingly endless stream of new discoveries of Manichaean texts and sites and the continuing work on the conservation of and decipherment of Manichean texts from what was Roman Egypt and the Silk Road have meant that the articles have all been fully revised and updated and in many cases expanded.

I would like to thank first my wife Judith, Lecturer in Christian Origins and Early Judaism at King's College London, who co-authored two of the articles (I and IV) in this volume. Her critical judgement and her deep knowledge of both Jewish and Christian sources of the first two centuries A.D. were always ready at my disposal. I am grateful to the British Academy, the Royal Swedish Academy, the Leverhulme Trust, the Society of Antiquaries, the Spalding Trust, the Seven Pillars of Wisdom Trust and the Research and Innovation Fund of Warwick University for co-funding the international project: Data-Base of Manichaean Texts from Roman Egypt and Central Asia (1990–94 now succeeded by the Corpus Fontium Manichaeorum). The generous financial assistance received from these bodies has enabled me to co-ordinate the research on Manichaean texts by a team of internationally distinguished scholars as well as younger researchers from Belgium, Denmark, Germany, Sweden, the U.S.A. and the U.K. I would like to thank in particular my Warwick colleague, Dr. Dominic Montserrat, who was the chief research-officer of the project from 1991–93 and who has kindly contributed a section on the discovery of the Manichaean texts from Kellis in this volume (pp. 87–89). I am also gTateful to Dr. I. M. F. Gardner (Edith Cowan) and Dr. R. G. Jenkins (Melbourne) for giving me access to some of the many still unpublished Manichaean texts from Kellis, especially texts found in the 1992–93 season. I also greatly appreciate the assistance given to me in research on the Manichaean texts from the Roman East as well as data-processing and proof-reading by other members of the team, notably Mrs. Caroline Lawrence (London), Dr. Erica Hunter (Cambridge), Mr. Mark Vermes (Warwick) and Mrs. Sarah Clackson (Cambridge). Mrs. Jean Dodgeon and Mrs. Sheila Vince undertook once more the arduous task of proof-reading a multilingual manuscript and I am supremely grateful to their vigilance and stylistic sense.

I owe much to Prof. Han Drijvers, the co-editor of the series: his outstanding contribution to the study of the history of Manichaeism and of Syrian Christianity is a constant source of encouragement and information. I thank him for the interest he has shown in my work over the last two decades and his generous invitation to me to contribute a volume of my . . .

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