The Days of Duchess Anne: Life in the Household of the Duchess of Hamilton, 1656-1716

The Days of Duchess Anne: Life in the Household of the Duchess of Hamilton, 1656-1716

The Days of Duchess Anne: Life in the Household of the Duchess of Hamilton, 1656-1716

The Days of Duchess Anne: Life in the Household of the Duchess of Hamilton, 1656-1716

Synopsis

In this fascinating and meticulously researched book, Rosalind K. Marshall recreates life in one of the most splendid Scottish houses of the seventeenth century. It contains a mass of detail about all aspects of the Duchess's life: what she did, read and wore; how much she paid her servants, where she educated her children; what the family bought, ate, drank; and how they entertained. It provides the most comprehensive picture available of aristocratic life in Scotland at the time.

Excerpt

On 16 January 1632 the young Marchioness of Hamilton gave birth to a second daughter, and for a second time family and friends received the news with ill-concealed disappointment. As she lay in her bedchamber in the palace of Whitehall, the Marchioness knew as well as anyone that she had been expected to present her husband with an heir. She was, after all, married to the representative of an ancient and powerful noble family. Although she herself had never visited Scotland, she was well aware that her husband’s estates there stretched across the country from his island of Arran in the west to his castle of Kinneil in the east, and from his palace of Hamilton near Glasgow right down the fertile valley of the River Clyde. His family had owned many of these lands since the beginning of the fourteenth century, and great was the power and influence they wielded. Not only did they exercise this power by virtue of territorial possession. An early Lord Hamilton had married the sister of the Scottish king, and ever since then they had been very close to the throne indeed. The Hamilton of his day had been governor of the realm when Mary Queen of Scots was a child, and the Marchioness’s father-in-law had been the leading Scottish favourite of James VI and I.

Brought up at the English Court and herself the niece of the great Duke of Buckingham, the Marchioness was fully conscious of the dynastic pressures of seventeenth-century society. Her husband’s ancient line must continue, and the House of Hamilton must be provided with an heir. However, she could console herself with the reflection that she was only nineteen, there would no doubt be other children, and the year old . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.