Talent Balancing: Staffing Your Company for Long-Term Success

Talent Balancing: Staffing Your Company for Long-Term Success

Talent Balancing: Staffing Your Company for Long-Term Success

Talent Balancing: Staffing Your Company for Long-Term Success

Synopsis

When the economy was booming, it was hard to find good people. "winning the talent war" was a popular phrase, and those individuals with the right stuff could command hefty salaries and perks. When the economy crumbled, the headhunters were sent packing. Today, companies are starting to hire again, but instead of recruiting a group of fifty, they're hiring five. They're outsourcing and hiring temps. They're replacing staff due to turnovers, retirements, and areas that were downsized, rather than expanding. They're relying on reduced HR departments and in-house managers and staff to make critical staffing decisions. Surprisingly, in this environment, good people are hard to find; the top performers are staying where they are, and it's the weak and marginal performers that make up most of the available talent pool. Talent Balancing draws from the author's 35 years in the field to present a fresh and practical approach to recruiting in today's volatile and uncertain environment. In particular, Talent Balancing will help entrepreneurs and managers without formal recruitment training navigate organizational politics, analyze current and future staffing needs, and execute a successful plan. Whether you are ramping up a new team or department or filling a temporary spot, Talent Balancing provides a wealth of insights and tools to ensure that your organization meets both immediate and long-term goals.

Excerpt

A BRIEF ECONOMIC HISTORY

The decade of the 1990s saw the economy skyrocket. The stock market went from below 3,000 to over 16,000. The gross national product (GNP) went from $6 trillion to $9 trillion. The result was a major shortage of employees. It was difficult to find people to fill open positions, and it was often impossible to find good quality people. The shortage opened the door for the professional recruiters and [headhunters.] They were hired as consultants, full time and part time. Companies were hiring twenty, thirty and forty people at a time, with little thought of slowing down. The country went into a hiring frenzy. Practically every organization had openings and people were job hopping so much you never knew where they were! Almost every industry was hiring; part time, full time, right out of school, right out of the military, and off shore, there were more jobs than people, and organizations had large groups of people in Human Resources (HR) dedicated only to recruiting. In addition, there were a lot individual contributors who were promoted to management positions because of the shortage. These people had no experience in evaluating resumes or interviewing people. But people were needed and there was lots of money to spend on [staffing up.]

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