Cloning

Cloning

Cloning

Cloning

Synopsis

In the field of social policy, some topics are so complicated that they will always be subject to debate. Since no clear right or wrong exists, they are consigned to the gray areas of ongoing dispute. Among such issues open for debate both across America and in this eye-opening series are capital punishment, genetic engineering, gun control, and global warming. Others involve terrorism and chemical and biological warfare, two outright evils, though with highly disputable solutions. Open for Debate explores the past, present, and future to shed light on complex, high-priority public policy. a lucid, readily accessible format offers the pros and cons of each issue with opinions from social policy experts. It features sidebars of fascinating facts and easy-to-understand diagrams of key statistics. Open for Debate introduces future public policy thinkers to both sides of twenty-first-century, life-and-death concerns.

Excerpt

Nearly two hundred years before it became scientifically possible, writers of fanciful fiction began teasing us with the prospect of creating human life in the laboratory rather than in the human body. The classic tale of a manmade man was Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, written in 1818 in England as a cautionary fable that was intended to warn us of the danger of playing God.

In Mary Shelley’s novel, the mad scientist Dr. Frankenstein creates a manlike creature that turns out to be a rampaging monster. Frankenstein’s monster kills a number of people and eventually destroys Dr. Frankenstein himself. This is the penalty one must pay, the author tells us, for attempting to violate the grand design of nature.

Fast forward to the year 1978 in the United States. On March 31, the purportedly true story of an aging multimillionaire, who had a newborn copy of himself created through laboratory science, appeared in bookstores. The book, which was accepted as nonfiction and soon climbed the bestseller lists, was written by a former journalist named David Rorvik. Its title was In His Image: The Cloning of a Man.

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