Dixie & the Dominion: Canada, the Confederacy, and the War for the Union

Dixie & the Dominion: Canada, the Confederacy, and the War for the Union

Dixie & the Dominion: Canada, the Confederacy, and the War for the Union

Dixie & the Dominion: Canada, the Confederacy, and the War for the Union

Synopsis

Dixie & the Dominionis a compelling look at how the U. S. Civil War was a shared experience that shaped the futures of both Canada and the United States. The book focuses on the last year of the war, between April of 1864 and 1865. During that 12-month period, the Confederate States sent spies and saboteurs to Canada on a secret mission. These agents struck fear along the frontier and threatened to draw Canada and Great Britain into the war.

During that same time, Canadians were making their own important decisions. Chief among them was the partnership between Liberal reformer George Brown and Conservative chieftain John A. Macdonald. Their unlikely coalition was the force that would create the Dominion of Canada in 1867, and it was the pressure of the war - with its threat to the colonies' security - that was a driving force behind this extraordinary pact.

Excerpt

Aflawless September day in Ottawa, Canada’s capital. the sky is a deep cobalt blue, and a slight warming breeze stirs the air. flags at half-mast move in a slow, graceful salute. On Parliament Hill, a red carpet extends towards a dais. Prime Minister Jean Chrétien, Governor General Adrienne Clarkson, and U.S. Ambassador to Canada Paul Cellucci walk slowly together. It is midday on a national day of mourning. Clarkson and Cellucci take their seats. Prime Minister Chrétien takes the podium:

Mr. Ambassador, you have assembled before you,
here on Parliament Hill and across Canada, a
people united in outrage, in grief, in compassion,
and in resolve. a people of every faith and nation
ality to be found on Earth. a people who, as a
result of the atrocity committed against the
United States on September 11, feel not only like
neighbours, but like family.

It is our feelings, our prayers and our actions
that count. By their outpouring of concern, sympa
thy and help, the feelings and actions of Canadians
have been clear. the message they send to the
American people is clear: “Do not despair. You are
not alone. We are with you. the world is with you.”

Martin Luther King, in describing times of trial
and tribulation, once said that: “In the end, it is

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