Leading in an Upside-Down World: New Canadian Perspectives on Leadership

Leading in an Upside-Down World: New Canadian Perspectives on Leadership

Leading in an Upside-Down World: New Canadian Perspectives on Leadership

Leading in an Upside-Down World: New Canadian Perspectives on Leadership

Synopsis

The world as we know it has been turned upside down by recent events but it's still a place where leadership is needed more than ever.

Fifteen Canadians with highly diverse perspectives and richly different experience explore this timely question in Leading in an Upside-Down World.

Chapter by chapter, stories of Canada unfold and future prospects for leadership grow clearer as these eminent Canadians explain how to "recognize leadership" in an age where old institutions and behaviours are being left behind. They also identify leadership attributes that endure. Leading in an Upside-Down Worldgives voice to both scholars and practitioners of Canadian-style leadership.

Excerpt

We are living in an upside-down world. It is a world altered significantly by quicksilver change and unpredictable, sometimes tragic events, a world in which globalization and the march of technological advance are evaporating time, shrinking distances, and making each nation a neighbour to all others. It is a world of great challenge — and also of great opportunity.

In this context — particularly of challenge and opportunity — it is timely to renew the exploration of leadership. There is a need for additional analysis, a desire for fresh thinking.

Leading in an Upside-Down World contains fresh thinking in abundance. Like leadership itself, this book is focused on the future; it is about looking ahead and examining past and present circumstances in order to anticipate what’s out there waiting for us.

I was pleased when Patrick Boyer, a friend and former colleague in the House of Commons, approached me several months ago to ask if I would write the foreword to this book.

I first met Patrick Boyer in the early 1980s when he was executive director of the Government of Canada’s Task Force on Conflict of Interest and largely responsible for the subsequent report, Ethical Conduct in the Public Sector. His work in the area of ethics is well regarded and deservedly so — it is superb.

I got to know him much better when we served in Parliament together a few years later. He is a journalist, a lawyer, an educator, and, for nine . . .

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