Medicine and the Making of Roman Women: Gender, Nature, and Authority from Celsus to Galen

Medicine and the Making of Roman Women: Gender, Nature, and Authority from Celsus to Galen

Medicine and the Making of Roman Women: Gender, Nature, and Authority from Celsus to Galen

Medicine and the Making of Roman Women: Gender, Nature, and Authority from Celsus to Galen

Synopsis

'The book delivers more than it promises... important book.' -Journal of Roman Studies'Flemming's translations are accurate and some of these texts have not been translated into a modern language before. The book is therefore very useful because it makes all these materials accessible to the non-classicist and offers an overview to those more familiar with classical texts.' -Medical History'In spite of the increased interest in both ancient medical science and the history of women, Rebecca Flemming's book covers a still quite neglected field by combining both of them.' -Medical HistoryDr Flemming has written a book about women and medicine in the first centuries of the Roman Empire, an important but neglected period. It is about female medical practitioners and patients in the Roman world, what male doctors wrote about women, how they understood them, and the wider effects their ideas and writings had upon women's lives.

Excerpt

This is a book about women and medicine in the first centuries of the Roman imperial era. It is about the women who practised medicine and the women who had it practised on them; about the contribution women and their place in society made to medical discourse, and the contribution medical discourse made to women’s place in society; about the ways women were described and located in that discourse, and about the effects it had. It is about how all these interrelate and interact in their broader context. This is, therefore, a book not just about a specific and integral aspect of the Roman empire— about its concerns with, its literary and organizational responses to, health and disease, and how these played out around women—but also about knowledge and power, about the historical configuration of gender, nature, and authority, more broadly. It is thus hoped that it will be of interest to all those concerned with these wider themes in whatever time and place, as well as those with more particular interests in antiquity. The workings of the classical world in these respects are illuminating of far more than that world alone.

Certainly it was an interest in these wider questions that prompted the research that has led to this book. This research was originally undertaken as a graduate student in University College London, and this book began as a Ph.D. thesis completed there. It thus owes a very considerable debt to my supervisors, Riet van Bremen and Michael Crawford, for all their good advice and generous assistance, then and since. Among the many other people who have also contributed to the thesis and helped its subsequent development in innumerable ways, I must particularly thank Vivian Nutton, who has given so freely of his great expertise in the area; Ann Ellis Hanson, who has provided such valuable encouragement and guidance; Helen King and Simon Price, for all their comments as examiners and after; and Jason Davies, John North, Bob Sharpies, Adam Sutcliffe, and Rosalind Thomas who have all . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.