Attending to Early Modern Women

Attending to Early Modern Women

Attending to Early Modern Women

Attending to Early Modern Women

Synopsis

Scholars from the fields of literature, history, and art history share their methodologies and insights as they recover the voices, texts, and images of European women during the early modern period. The collection also addresses the places of community that existed, or were imagined, among women in the early modern period, the extent to which women were marginalized by their gender, and how such other afflictions, such as race, class, and religion, affected such marginalization.

Excerpt

Established in 1981 through the vision of Dr. Shirley S. Kenny, provost of arts and humanities at the University of Maryland at College Park, and the beneficence of the Maryland legislature during an all-too-familiar period of retrenchment in higher education, the Center for Renaissance and Baroque Studies held its inaugural conference on 11–12 March 1982. From the outset, the university has envisaged the center as multidisciplinary. Music and the visual arts, literature in several modern European and Asian languages, philosophy, and history—indeed all the appropriate disciplines in the humanistic pantheon—come within the center’s sphere. Throughout the academic year, the center engages the university community, the wider educational community in Maryland, and Washington/Baltimore-area cultural institutions with a continuing program of interdisciplinary symposia, public lectures, colloquia, and artistic performances. the center also has partnerships with many Maryland school districts and offers statewide and national programs for secondary schoolteachers of literature, drama, and the performing arts. These secondary schoolteachers are always included in the audience at other events as well.

This volume is the second to take up questions relating to the lives and production of early modern women. the first volume, Attending to Women in Early Modern England (University of Delaware Press, 1994), recorded a dynamic scholarly exchange that took place in November 1990 at a symposium sponsored by the Center for Renaissance and Baroque Studies at the University of Maryland, College Park. This volume, too, had its genesis at a symposium held three and a half years later at College Park on 21–23 April 1994. the conversations, formal papers, and workshops that filled two crowded days are recorded here. a shift to include continental European women in the early modern period signals one difference between the first and second volumes. the commitment to an interdisciplinary framework, however, remains firm. the essays collected here, contributed by scholars of literature, history, and art history, raise questions about research . . .

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