History of Scholarship: A Selection of Papers from the Seminar on the History of Scholarship Held Annually at the Warburg Institute

History of Scholarship: A Selection of Papers from the Seminar on the History of Scholarship Held Annually at the Warburg Institute

History of Scholarship: A Selection of Papers from the Seminar on the History of Scholarship Held Annually at the Warburg Institute

History of Scholarship: A Selection of Papers from the Seminar on the History of Scholarship Held Annually at the Warburg Institute

Synopsis

The history of scholarship has undergone a complete renewal in recent years, and is now a major branch of research with vast territories to explore; a substantial introduction to History of Scholarship surveys the past vicissitudes of the history of scholarship and its current expansion. Theauthors, all specialists of international standing, come from a variety of backgrounds: classical studies, history of religions, philosophy, early modern intellectual and religious history. Their papers illustrate a variety of themes and approaches, including Renaissance antiquarianism andphilology; the rise of the notion of criticism; Biblical and patristic scholarship, and its implications for both confessional orthodoxy and eighteeenth-century free thought; the history of philosophy; and German historiographical thought in both the eighteenth and the nineteenth centuries. Thischallenging volume constitutes a collection of remarkable quality, helping to establish the history of scholarship as a more broadly acknowledged, worthwhile field of study in its own right.

Excerpt

The history of scholarship as a distinct pursuit, larger in scope than ‘reviews of scholarship’ ad hoc, and more specific in content than what ‘scholarship’ taken as a nomen actionis suggests, has had a somewhat marginal and ill-defined existence. There are grounds for thinking that, as a constituted branch of knowledge, an episteme, it has, until quite recently, hardly existed at all. This has begun to change, and Part I of the Introduction offers a brief survey of the new developments. The present volume may be seen as a contribution to them. What might be termed a negative history of scholarship—up to the nineteenth century, i.e. the chronological limit of the volume—is sketched out in Part II.

The history of scholarship is both old and new. It is old as an epiphenomenon of scholarship itself, in the sense that early modern scholars were deeply concerned to preserve the memory of their mentors, friends, and associates in the Republic of Letters. Treasuring and trading papers and memorials, compiling literary biographies, editing scholarly correspondence were essential activities. The result was an impressive range of publications, some of which are still used today as reference works. The collections of letters that were printed in the last decades of

The Editors planned the Introduction together but their contributions are distinct: JeanLouis Quantin is responsible for Part I and the section on France in Part II; Christopher Ligota for the rest of Part II, from Bacon to German historicism.

An obvious instance is Christian Gottlieb Jöcher, Allgemeines Gelehrten-Lexicon (Leipzig, 1750–11, repr. Hildesheim, 1961), continued and supplemented by Johann Christoph Adelung (Leipzig, 1784–1819, repr. Hildesheim, 1997–8). See also Melchior Adam, Dignorum laude virorum, quos Musa vetat mori, immortalitas, seu vitae theologorum, jure-consultorum & politicorum, medicorum atque philosophorum [this includes philologists, poets, mathematicians, and physicists]…, 3rd edn. (Frankfurt am Main, 1705),

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