ADD/ADHD Drug Free: Natural Alternatives and Practical Exercises to Help Your Child Focus

ADD/ADHD Drug Free: Natural Alternatives and Practical Exercises to Help Your Child Focus

ADD/ADHD Drug Free: Natural Alternatives and Practical Exercises to Help Your Child Focus

ADD/ADHD Drug Free: Natural Alternatives and Practical Exercises to Help Your Child Focus

Synopsis

Attention Deficit Disorder and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADD/ADHD) are among the most misunderstood problems facing young children today. Drugs like Ritalin and Cylert are traditionally prescribed to treat these disorders, but their use is controversial. While many children have been helped by these medications, at best, pills only temporarily improve symptoms. Sometimes they don't work at all, and they can come with disturbing side effects such as weight loss, insomnia, and may even slow growth in younger children.

ADD/ADHD Drug Free gives frustrated parents a long-awaited natural alternative. The first book to feature enjoyable, practical activities for children that will help them cope with their disorder by strengthening brain functioning, this life-changing guide shows parents, teachers, and counselors how they can improve learning and behavior effectively and without medication. Timely and thoroughly researched, this guide will help thousands of children become more focused and more successful in school and in life, without jeopardizing their health.

Excerpt

I would like to personally welcome you to this fine book, a state of the art, practical guide on developing the brain. I respect great scientific information … but I want to know how to USE this information, and that’s why I am so excited about this book. It is USABLE, and it fills a great need.

I first met Frank Jacobelli at my seminar on bipolar illness. The punch line of the seminar is how the executive functions in the prefrontal lobe go out like a light bulb when a bipolar person is manic. That explains how a normally brilliant person with a lot of common sense can surprisingly gamble away their life savings during a manic episode. They don’t see the bigger picture or consequences of their actions. Mania temporarily creates a chemical imbalance similar to taking amphetamines, which blocks the prefrontal lobe and speeds up the cognitive area. So they are thinking faster, but seeing a smaller picture. Without benefit of the prefrontal lobe, their judgment is poor and their behavior is risk laden.

Attention deficit is different as far as the chemical imbalance, but the outcome may be similar in that a person with attention deficit may not see the bigger picture or consequences of their actions. Whether manic or attention deficit, there is very little activity in the prefrontal lobe as shown by Single-photon emission computed tomography.

Normally, one of the significant stages of the development of our prefrontal lobes happens in adolescence. The adolescent begins to develop PERSPECTIVE and becomes SELF-AWARE. (When this happens, the IQs of the parents drop about 40 points, and the parents don’t get any “smarter” until this kid has children of his own and realizes that maybe Mom and Dad weren’t so dumb after all).

The prefrontal lobe is that part of yourself that SEES what you are thinking and decides whether you are going to say it or not. Preadolescents don’t have this ability, in general. If they are thinking it, you are hearing it. The prefrontal lobe is that part of yourself that SEES what you are feeling and decides whether to express that emotion or not. If . . .

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