Emotional Intelligence for Project Managers: The People Skills You Need to Achieve Outstanding Results

Emotional Intelligence for Project Managers: The People Skills You Need to Achieve Outstanding Results

Emotional Intelligence for Project Managers: The People Skills You Need to Achieve Outstanding Results

Emotional Intelligence for Project Managers: The People Skills You Need to Achieve Outstanding Results

Synopsis

In order to run projects successfully, project managers need to master more than the requisite technical knowledge. The more complex the project, the more significant their interpersonal skills become to achieving a successful outcome. Without the people skills necessary to lead effectively, even the most carefully orchestrated project can quickly fall apart.

Emotional Intelligence for Project Managers introduces readers to the basic concepts of emotional intelligence and shows how to apply them to their project goals. Readers will learn how to:

• set the tone and direction for the project

• communicate more effectively

• improve listening skills

• create a positive work environment

• motivate, coach, and mentorteam members

• productively handle stress, criticism, and blame

• and more.

Complete with checklists and self-assessments, this handy guide enables project managers to apply these important skills to their projects right away.

Excerpt

“Do you have any idea how dangerous it is not to be in touch with your feelings?” This question was posed to me in the summer of 2001 by Rich, a therapist who has since become my career coach and mentor. His words stopped me in my tracks. Dangerous? That was a curious word choice. What could be dangerous about not being in touch with my feelings? I was thirty-nine years old and had been a successful project manager (PM) for over seventeen years. I had a record of slow but steady career progression. I had been certified as a Project Management Professional (PMP) since 1995. I owned my own project management consulting business and lived, taught, and even breathed project management. No one had ever asked me about feelings before. No one had ever mentioned that there might be danger involved. What could be dangerous? What was so important about feelings?

Rich’s question resonated with me but I wasn’t sure why. It didn’t feel dangerous to be out of touch with my emotions. However, I had a nagging sense that he saw or knew things that I didn’t. On some level I recognized that the way I approached work wasn’t always effective. Hard work did not always make the difference in the outcomes of the projects I managed. I wondered how others seemed to succeed with less effort. I also felt insecure about the lack of personal and professional relationships I had built, and I suspected that it was hurting me. As much as I wanted to deny that my career . . .

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