Getting to Innovation: How Asking the Right Questions Generates the Great Ideas Your Company Needs

Getting to Innovation: How Asking the Right Questions Generates the Great Ideas Your Company Needs

Getting to Innovation: How Asking the Right Questions Generates the Great Ideas Your Company Needs

Getting to Innovation: How Asking the Right Questions Generates the Great Ideas Your Company Needs

Synopsis


As an acknowledged guru in the field of creativity and innovation, Arthur Van Gundy has inspired businesses in a variety of industries to generate more original, cutting-edge ideas. Getting to Innovation is a detailed guide to achieving the critical first step in formulating creative and useful ideas - i.e., asking the right questions that define the challenges facing any organization. Readers will discover:

• how to write positioning and rationale statements for each challenge

• how to link together multiple objectives in priority frameworks

• the top 10 techniques for generating creative ideas

• tips for designing and running brainstorming retreats

• advice on how to select the best ideas from the many that have been generated

When it comes to true innovation, it's not formulating the great ideas, but asking the right questions that will ultimately lead to results. Getting to Innovation offers the tools to help every company tap into its most inspired thinking.

Excerpt

Anyone who has followed management trends for the past forty or so years knows that there always seems to be the so-called Next Big Thing. In the 1950s, basic brainstorming was the rage, with countless articles written about it, some good and some not so good—for example, “brainstorming is nothing more than cerebral popcorn!” In the 1960s and early 1970s, sensitivity groups (or “T-groups”) were in vogue. Group leader gurus would “lead” groups of managers by not leading. That is, after some broad, brief opening remarks, they would silently sit there waiting for someone in the group to say something. After that, they mostly would just facilitate and try to clarify. Supposedly, the “inner manager” somehow would emerge. Again, more research would follow with inconclusive findings. The 1980s ushered in the age of the quality movement (although some would maintain it began earlier) with the implementation of quality control, quality circles, Kaizen, Six Sigma, and other related approaches for enhancing worker performance.

Although the quality movement still exists, the 1990s saw the beginnings of corporate innovation as the next “it” approach, emerging from components of the emphasis on quality. Innovation has hit the corporate world with a force unknown in previous generations of business trends; however, profit-driven organizations have not been alone. Globalization of technology, media, cultures, commerce, and the new economy have created a momentum to forge new directions with customers and clients. Managers in profit, nonprofit, government, military, or educational institutions all now face the unenviable task of innovating like never before. The call has gone out for new ideas, fresh . . .

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