Leading with Kindness: How Good People Consistently Get Superior Results

Leading with Kindness: How Good People Consistently Get Superior Results

Leading with Kindness: How Good People Consistently Get Superior Results

Leading with Kindness: How Good People Consistently Get Superior Results

Synopsis


Leadershipnow.com / The Best Leadership Books of 2008

By now, many leaders have realized that when it comes to business, nice guys often finish first. Old-fashioned images of corporate callousness and greed have been replaced by a gentler, more human conception of great leadership. But how does one define "kindness" in the context of business? And what is the best way to "use" this deceptively complex notion as a guiding principle to lead an organization successfully into the future?

Far from presenting a naive idea of kindness, this eye-opening book identifies the surprising attributes successful "kind" leaders share. Readers will learn how they can use kindness to:

• motivate employees, committee members, and others

• recognize unique talents while nurturing all employees

• establish a supportive environment

• spur continuous organizational growth

• adapt to change

• stimulate calculated "stretch" and risk-taking

• prepare the next generation of leaders

This realistic book shows leaders how they can use sincerity, honesty, and respect for the good of their organizations.

Excerpt

In Leading with Kindness: How Good People Consistently Get Superior Results, Bill Baker and Michael O’Malley explore how one of the most unheralded features of leadership—basic human kindness— drives successful organizations. The authors’ creativity, experience, and first-rate intellect have produced a book of original and relevant insights, resulting in a significant contribution to this most scrutinized of subjects.

While people generally recognize that a leader’s emotional intelligence factors into that person’s leadership style, most are reluctant to judge it as being as important as analytical ability, decision-making skills, or proficiency in execution. Such emotions as compassion, empathy, and kindness are often dismissed as unquantifiable in their impact on organizations or are mistaken for weakness. Yet, research in neuroscience and social sciences clearly reveals the physiological and cultural basis of emotional resonance in social networks and its measurable effects on both individual and group performance.

Great leaders have always relied on emotion to get things done: Managers inspire employees to collaborate, coaches rally players to win games, and politicians persuade voters to elect them. But kindness, the leadership emotion that Baker and O’Malley focus on, is not what people immediately associate with business, let alone with their . . .

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