Project Management That Works: Real-World Advice on Communicating, Problem Solving, and Everything Else You Need to Know to Get the Job Done

Project Management That Works: Real-World Advice on Communicating, Problem Solving, and Everything Else You Need to Know to Get the Job Done

Project Management That Works: Real-World Advice on Communicating, Problem Solving, and Everything Else You Need to Know to Get the Job Done

Project Management That Works: Real-World Advice on Communicating, Problem Solving, and Everything Else You Need to Know to Get the Job Done

Synopsis


Project management is one of the fastest-growing occupations in the world. The Project Management Institute has seen membership growth of more than 1000% in the last 10 years. But while many of these managers know how to plan a successful project in theory, very few have the practical tools needed to navigate the politics of today's corporate world. Project managers need more than just technical skills; they need the right communication skills to succeed. Filled with real-world examples, Project Management That Works gives readers the tools they need to:

communicate with their team as well as stakeholders
• get their teams to function well
• run fewer and more productive meetings
• turn around failing projects
• utilize data properly to make emotional conversations unemotional
• know when a project is really done

The only book that addresses the real challenges project managers face today, this is an accessible and invaluable tool that will show every reader how to accomplish his mission - no matter the obstacles.

Excerpt

Welcome to a Project Management That Works: Real-World Advice on Communicating, Problem Solving, and Everything Else You Need to Know to Get the Job Done. The growth in project management is undeniable and is one of the fastest-growing occupations in the world. PMI® has seen membership growth of 1,000 percent in the last 10 years, with members in 157 countries. The membership continues to rise at a rate of 30 percent each year. The U.S. Department of Labor predicts explosive growth for the profession through 2014. Because this is such an exploding profession, there is a great need for a guidebook to help both new and experienced project managers improve their skills and procedures. This book is designed to do just that.

Roughly 7 years ago, I was part of one of the worst projects that I have ever encountered. I was always away from my family, was not excited about my job, and depressed. I was questioning whether or not I wanted to remain a project manager or choose another career path. I decided to walk aimlessly throughout a mall while I contemplated my future. I ended up in a bookstore and wandered over to the business section. I picked up a book called Radical Project Management by Rob Thomsett. It was a new take on some common project management theories and presented new ways of looking at managing projects. I was so enthralled by the book that I read it cover to cover right there in the store. It made a significant impact on me and how I manage projects. I decided to stay a project manager.

Reflecting on that time, I decided that I wanted to write a book that did more than just discuss proper project management techniques. Really, I wanted to write a book that was a culmination of the lessons learned, frustrations, and events that have been experienced throughout my career. This is that book. There is a significant gap between the principles of project management and the application of project management in many corporate environments. I often compare it to taking a driving test. We were all taught that your hands should be kept at 10 and 2 on the steering wheel, to signal a certain distance from a turn, and how to properly merge. Yet, almost all of us will break many of those rules when we get behind the wheel of a car. Project management is the same way. Trained project managers learn the principles and reasons for running a successful project. However, when it comes to running the project, we tend to selectively decide what we will and will not do.

Corporate culture and what it will mandate as process is another stumbling block in the path of the project manager. The executives will say that they want to have visibility into the enterprise, yet will not support time tracking to the task level. They want to be notified of issues and risks, but will not spend . . .

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