Rebuilding Brand America: What We Must Do to Restore Our Reputation and Safeguard the Future of American Business Abroad

Rebuilding Brand America: What We Must Do to Restore Our Reputation and Safeguard the Future of American Business Abroad

Rebuilding Brand America: What We Must Do to Restore Our Reputation and Safeguard the Future of American Business Abroad

Rebuilding Brand America: What We Must Do to Restore Our Reputation and Safeguard the Future of American Business Abroad

Synopsis


Anti-American feeling is at an all-time high. Other nations and cultures have singled out our businesses, government, and way of life for harsh scorn, widespread resentment, even violence.

Rebuilding Brand America is an exploration of anti-Americanism, from its causes and earliest manifestations to current efforts to mitigate it. Martin explains why many of these efforts failed, and reviews the manyprescriptions formulated by more than a dozen task forces. He then bases his recommendations on the best practices of leading companies, and on his own 32-year career in public relations and brand management.

Rebuilding Brand America features exclusive interviews with journalists, media and PR professionals, and executives from global icons like McDonald's, Wal-Mart, and FedEx, and analyzes the groundbreaking work of thought leaders such as:

• Pollster John Zogby, whose insights into the Muslim world continue to inform policy in the Middle East.

• Newsweek editor Fareed Zakaria, whose essay on the 9/11 attacks shed new light on the Islamic mind.

• Keith Reinhard, president of Business for Diplomatic Action, a non-partisan business group organized to fight anti-Americanism by addressing its causes in U. S. business practice.

Based on a deep understanding of anti-Americanism's roots, Rebuilding Brand America is a call to action that will help U. S.-based companies prosper in global markets.

Excerpt

“The terrorist attacks of 11 September 2001 sharply punctuated the end of the American century. Indeed, the era we are now entering may well come to be recalled as ‘the anti-American century.’”

—Ivan Krastev, research director, Remarque Institute, New York University

the world, WE’RE told, is flat. IT’S also tipping, and not in America’s favor. Pollsters tell us that United States’ foreign policy— especially in the Middle East—accounts for 35 percent of anti-American feelings around the world. Whether the true proportion is 35 percent or 75 percent is small comfort for U.S.headquartered businesses, which once happily rode on America’s coattails but have grown tired of recent bumps. the question businesses should be asking is how much blame they share for the balance of the ill feeling and whether they are somehow contributing to the tilt.

Those are the issues explored in this book, along with best practices in dealing with them. But first, I should make it clear that I am neither a foreign policy expert nor an economist; I spent most of my career in the worlds of advertising, public relations, and brand management. This book starts from the premise that America is a “brand,” not in the sense that the name itself has commercial value (though it does), but because the notion of America occupies a special place in the hearts and minds of people around the world. American businesses share that space and, if it has become a bit shabby and less welcoming . . .

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