Good Governance for Nonprofits: Developing Principles and Policies for an Effective Board

Good Governance for Nonprofits: Developing Principles and Policies for an Effective Board

Good Governance for Nonprofits: Developing Principles and Policies for an Effective Board

Good Governance for Nonprofits: Developing Principles and Policies for an Effective Board

Synopsis

Many nonprofits are reluctant to develop a policies manual, believing that it takes far too much time, effort, and expertise. But the lack of responsible policies and governance can actually end up costing an organization much more in the long run -- both in reputation and in resources.

Good Governance for Nonprofits is a succint but thorough guide that will help organizations develop a board that is legally and ethically responsible and effective in advancing their needs. The authors offer a clear process for creating a policies manual to help boards apply proven standards of governance or "attributes of excellence." Now even with limited resources, nonprofit leaders will learn how to:

• eliminate redundant or outdated policies

• add new policies more effectively

• clearly guide the CEO and evaluate his or her performance

• ensure compliance with relevant legislation and regulations

• understand why certain policies should be included

• adapt the authors' templates to their specific needs.

Excerpt

Without a meaningful mission, an organization has no pur
pose.

Without effective implementation of that mission, an organi
zation fails.

Good governance is essential for both a meaningful mission
and its effective implementation.

While much of my experience with governance has occurred serving as a CEO and on the Boards of Directors of public for-profit corporations, I have also had the opportunity to serve on the Boards of both large and small nonprofits. Although the shareholders and their expectations for results are more clearly defined for the for-profit organization, the accountability and ownership of results for both the for-profit and nonprofit ultimately rests with the Board of Directors. The effective implementation of this responsibility is not determined only by a monetary measurement but also includes whether there has been a change and improvement in the lives of the people working for and being served by the organization.

The widely publicized failures and bad governance practices of some organizations have caught the attention of Congress, other regulating bodies, and the general public. For the for-profit public . . .

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