Suzuki's Green Guide

Suzuki's Green Guide

Suzuki's Green Guide

Suzuki's Green Guide

Synopsis

David Suzuki has spent over 40 years as a passionate advocate of sustainability and care for the planet. No-one is better qualified to produce a concise and informative guide to how to live sustainably. This book identifies the individual human actions that cause the most environmental damage, and offers strategies for individuals to reduce the size of their ecological footprint. It shows how we can be greener in the homes where we live, the way we travel, the food we eat, and the things we buy. There are vital tips for readers to: - create a healthy indoor environment- decrease energy and water use- choose eco-friendly transport- make simple diet changes to eat fresher healthier food The authors also point to ways in which individuals can join together and influence public opinion and government policies, with the aim of reaching a tipping point' in the movement for a sustainable future.

Excerpt

We shape our buildings
and afterwards our buildings shape us.

WINSTON CHURCHILL

Gas-guzzling SUVs get a lot of blame for creating pollution and causing climate change, and rightly so. But the average home in the industrialised world actually causes more than twice the greenhouse gas emissions of the average vehicle. Part of the problem is that when we flip a switch or turn on a tap, the environmental consequences are out of sight and out of mind. Electricity and water appear to be limitless and using them in vast quantities seems benign. The reality is that building and living in today’s homes accounts for 70% of electricity use, 35% of greenhouse gas emissions, and approximately 30% of landfill waste in the U.S. and Canada. The total footprint of an average single-family house includes over 300 metric tons (660,000 pounds) of material, and is growing. In the U.S., the size of a new house increased by at least 45 metres (500 square feet) every twenty years between 1950 and 1990 (see Table 2). Yet average household size in the U.S. has fallen from 3.3 people to 2.6 people since 1960 and the trend in other parts of the . . .

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