Parenthood Lost: Healing the Pain after Miscarriage, Stillbirth, and Infant Death

Parenthood Lost: Healing the Pain after Miscarriage, Stillbirth, and Infant Death

Parenthood Lost: Healing the Pain after Miscarriage, Stillbirth, and Infant Death

Parenthood Lost: Healing the Pain after Miscarriage, Stillbirth, and Infant Death

Synopsis

In Parenthood Lost, Michael Berman shares his technique that helps parents deal with their grief and unravels the confusing genetic causes of miscarriage, stillbirth, and infant death.

Excerpt

Sherwin B. Nuland

The physicians of the Hippocratic era called medicine the Art, because they knew that the care of their fellows was an act of creativity. Even as they sought to identify signs, physical findings and other objective evidence of disease that all could agree upon, they also recognized that each patient and his or her physician form a bond that is unique unto itself. That bond is the foundation upon which healing takes place.

The bond's formation and maintenance is the fundamental aspect of the Art, no less a creative act than is healing itself. It has little to do with science, and a great deal to do with the human need to be understood. It goes beyond the notion of mere empathy and sometimes comes very near to being a kind of love. There are doctors whose ability to respond to the emotional needs of patients is so profound that wonder becomes a paramount factor in the way they are viewed by their colleagues. We are in awe of their ability to heal, even when their ability to cure is no greater than our own. of the various ways in which the Art makes itself manifest, this may be the greatest of all. For cure is not always possible.

It is when we cannot cure that the bond of patient with doctor reaches its ultimate challenge, straining to bring acceptance and consolation to ease the days of those who cannot be relieved of their sickness, and also of those who love them. When the struggle is ended without cure, those who are left behind are not to be forgotten.

And so, there are poets among us. the physician who nurtures the rhythms and streamings of life is no less a poet than the literary craftsman who nurtures the rhythms and streamings of language. Both sense the harmonies of nature, and are part of them; both sense the harmonies of nature, and heal by leading others to their restorative wellsprings.

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