The Project Management Tool Kit: 100 Tips and Techniques for Getting the Job Done Right

The Project Management Tool Kit: 100 Tips and Techniques for Getting the Job Done Right

The Project Management Tool Kit: 100 Tips and Techniques for Getting the Job Done Right

The Project Management Tool Kit: 100 Tips and Techniques for Getting the Job Done Right

Synopsis

Today's projects are more complex and challenging than ever, and project managers need all the help they can get to succeed amid shifting priorities, interruptions, inadequate funding, expectations of multiple stakeholders, and other obstacles.

A practical on-the-job resource for project managers in any industry, this fully revised and updated edition of The Project Management Tool Kit is packed with results-oriented, practical tips on:


Activity definition and delegation
• Estimating and refining project schedules and risks
• Resource planning and funding
• Selecting and using project metrics
• Documentation and project monitoring
• Working with new teams and new technology
• Handling inherited projects
• Forecasting project completion
• Special situations, contingencies, and project cancellations
• Project cause-and-effect analysis
• And much more


Complete with checklists, examples, and clear graphics, The Project Management Tool Kit offers 100 practical, use-them-now strategies for mastering any project challenge.

Excerpt

What: Documenting the activities resulting from the lowest
level of the project work breakdown structure (WBS)
and assigning an owner to each.

When: Project planning.

Results: Clear descriptions of all identified project work and
delegation of responsibility.

Verify Activities

Activity definition is a key step in project plan development. After developing the work breakdown structure (WBS), verify that all work listed is necessary. If the work at the lowest level will probably require more than a month to complete or more than 80 hours of effort, strive to break it down further.

People often overlook work related to organizational, business, or legal requirements. Examples include preparation for project life cycle checkpoints, methodology requirements, project and other reviews, scheduled presentations, and specific documents the project must create. Add any missing work you discover to the WBS and scope baseline.

Describe Activities

Convert the lowest-level WBS entries into project activities that can be estimated, scheduled, and tracked. Check that each represents a discrete, separate piece of work that has a starting and a stopping point. For each piece of work, capture and document any assumptions.

Describe each lowest-level work package concisely in terms of the work to be done and the task deliverable (examples: install power, edit user documentation). These verb-noun descriptions ensure clarity and make planning and tracking easier.

Identify one or more specific deliverables for each lowest-level activity. For . . .

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