The Dirty Dozen: How Twelve Supreme Court Cases Radically Expanded Government and Eroded Freedom

The Dirty Dozen: How Twelve Supreme Court Cases Radically Expanded Government and Eroded Freedom

The Dirty Dozen: How Twelve Supreme Court Cases Radically Expanded Government and Eroded Freedom

The Dirty Dozen: How Twelve Supreme Court Cases Radically Expanded Government and Eroded Freedom

Synopsis

A non-lawyer's guide to the worst Supreme Court decisions of the modern era

The Dirty Dozen takes on twelve Supreme Court cases that changed American history—and yet are not well known to most Americans.

Starting in the New Deal era, the Court has allowed breathtaking expansions of government power that significantly reduced individual rights and abandoned limited federal government as envisioned by the founders.

For example:
" Helvering v. Davis (1937) allowed the government to take money from some and give it to others, without any meaningful constraints
" Wickard v. Filburn (1942) let Congress use the interstate commerce clause to regulate even the most trivial activities—neither interstate nor commerce
" Kelo v. City of New London (2005) declared that the government can seize private property and transfer it to another private owner

Levy and Mellor untangle complex Court opinions to explain how The Dirty Dozen harmed ordinary Americans. They argue for a Supreme Court that will enforce what the Constitution actually says about civil liberties, property rights, racial preferences, gun ownership, and many other controversial issues.

Excerpt

Too often Americans take for granted that they are free. But if America truly is the land of the free, should we have to ask for government permission to participate in an election? Or pursue an honest occupation? And should our government be empowered to take someone’s home only to turn the property over to others for their private use?

Of course not.

So why are we less free now, in many respects, than we were two hundred years ago? How did we get from our Founders’ Constitution, which established a strictly limited government, to today’s Constitution, which has expanded government and curtailed individual rights? That’s the story of The Dirty Dozen.

This book is about twelve Supreme Court cases that changed the course of American history—away from constitutional government. Surprisingly, few of these cases are widely known despite their enormous impact. Maybe McConnell v. Federal Election Commission (2003), because of its recent vintage, is recognized as the case that gave political speech less First Amendment protection than flag burning or Internet pornography. But how many of us recall that Wickard v. Filburn (1942) paved the way for the noxious notion that Congress, under the guise of regulating interstate commerce, can criminalize the use by critically ill . . .

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