No Mexicans, Women, or Dogs Allowed: The Rise of the Mexican American Civil Rights Movement

No Mexicans, Women, or Dogs Allowed: The Rise of the Mexican American Civil Rights Movement

No Mexicans, Women, or Dogs Allowed: The Rise of the Mexican American Civil Rights Movement

No Mexicans, Women, or Dogs Allowed: The Rise of the Mexican American Civil Rights Movement

Synopsis

Founded by Mexican American men in 1929, the League of United Latin-American Citizens (LULAC) has usually been judged according to Chicano nationalist standards of the late 1960s and 1970s. Drawing on extensive archival research, including the personal papers of Alonso S. Perales and Adela Sloss-Vento,No Mexicans, Women, or Dogs Allowed presents the history of LULAC in a new light, restoring its early twentieth-century context.

Cynthia Orozco also provides evidence that perceptions of LULAC as a petite bourgeoisie, assimilationist, conservative, anti-Mexican, anti-working class organization belie the realities of the group's early activism. Supplemented by oral history, this sweeping study probes LULAC's predecessors, such as the Order Sons of America, blending historiography and cultural studies. Against a backdrop of the Mexican Revolution, World War I, gender discrimination, and racial segregation,No Mexicans, Women, or Dogs Allowedrecasts LULAC at the forefront of civil rights movements in America.

Excerpt

LULAC, I SALUTE YOU
Friends, I'd like to tell you
What happened in Corpus
Some men got together
And formed LULAC
They were few in numbers
But they had a lot of courage.
They were tired of seeing their people
Suffer such pain.
Garza and his friends
Men of devotion.
But in their hearts
They felt a revolution.

—EUSEBIO “CHEVO” MORALES,
LULAC MEMBER, 1987

The League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) is the oldest Mexican American civil rights organization in the United States and celebrated its eightieth anniversary in 2009. With several thousand members today, it is one of the largest Latino voluntary associations. Mexican American men founded LULAC on February 17, l929, in Corpus Christi, Texas, when the Corpus Christi chapter of the Order Sons of America (OSA), the Order Knights of America (OKA) of San Antonio, and the League of Latin Amer-

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