Relocating Identities in Latin American Cultures

Relocating Identities in Latin American Cultures

Relocating Identities in Latin American Cultures

Relocating Identities in Latin American Cultures

Synopsis

This collection explores the perpetually changing notion of Latin American identity, particularly as illustrated in literature and other forms of cultural expression. Editor Elizabeth Montes Garcés has gathered contributions from specialists who examine the effects of such major phenomena as migration, globalization, and gender on the construct of Latin American identities, and, as such, are reshaping the traditional understanding of Latin Americas cultural history. The contributors to this volume are experts in Latin American literature and culture. Covering a diverse range of genres from poetry to film, their essays explore themes such as feminism, deconstruction, and postcolonial theory as they are reflected in the Latin American cultural milieu.

Excerpt

Elizabeth Montes Garcés, University of Calgary

This volume explores the ever-changing process of the de/construction of identities in Latin-American literatures and cultures. Responding to a number of phenomena such as migration, globalization, and gender, the eleven articles contained in this book engage the questions of location, time, and place. Three of the articles are revised versions of papers presented at the Negotiating Identities in Latin American Cultures conference held at the University of Calgary on 30 and 31 January 2004. However, the process of preparing the manuscript for publication revealed that Relocating Identities was a more appropriate title for the collection, since considerations of space and time are crucial in the analysis of all of the cultural and literary products (novels, short stories, essays, plays, poems, and films) included in this publication. The theoretical approaches used to study the topic are quite eclectic and they range from close readings to textual analyses based on feminism, deconstruction, postcolonial theory, and cultural studies.

Latin American theorists such as Santiago Castro Gómez and Jesús Martín Barbero address in their studies the importance of change in the conceptions of time and space. According to Barbero (1993, 373), globalization, with its emphasis on mass communication, accentuates the split between the local and the global. While the corporate elite occupies global cyberspace to handle their financial transactions and hold economic power, Latin American countries prevail in the dislocated time/space of their local cultures. In other words, the technical revolution has promoted the revival of identitary movements all over Latin America. In order to counteract the power exercised by transnational corporations and mass media, Latin . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.