Cosmology, Ecology, and the Energy of God

Cosmology, Ecology, and the Energy of God

Cosmology, Ecology, and the Energy of God

Cosmology, Ecology, and the Energy of God

Synopsis

This book brings together process and postmodern theologians to reflect on the crucial topic of energy, asking: What are some of the connections between energy and theology? How do ideas about humanity and divinity interrelate with how we live our lives? Its contributors address energy in at least three distinct ways. First, in terms of physics, the discovery of dark energy in 1998 uncovered a mysterious force that seems to be driving the inflation of the universe. Here cosmology converges with theological reflection about the nature and origin ofthe universe. Second, the social and ecological contexts of energy use and the current energy crisis have theological implications insofar as they are caught up with ultimate human meanings and values. Finally, in more traditional theological terms of divine spiritual energy, we can ask how human conceptions of energy relate to divine energy in terms of creative power.

Excerpt

What does energy have to do with theology? We face an energy crisis, an energy deficit, not only in material resources but also in terms of creative thinking. Theology is reflection about what concerns us ultimately, and many theologians and religious people give that object of ultimate concern the name God. Today we live in a world that is threatened in ecological and environmental ways, and many humans, including theologians, are drawing on traditional, modern, technical, and spiritual resources to reflect upon and provide resources to intervene with this situation. Eco-theology is a vital and important discourse, but there has been almost no explicit attention to the topic of energy from a theological perspective. One counterinstance, however, is Flora Keshgegian, who, toward the end of her book God Reflected: Metaphors for Life, invokes the metaphor of energy. She asks: “What happens to our image of God if the divine is understood to be energy for life? What difference would it make if God were not a being, but energy as the really real that makes life happen?”

Following upon Keshgegian's question, Cosmology, Ecology, and the Energy of God brings together a group of essays by creative theologians and theorists of religion on the interdisciplinary topic of energy. The contribu-

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