Rising above Sweatshops: Innovative Approaches to Global Labor Challenges

Rising above Sweatshops: Innovative Approaches to Global Labor Challenges

Rising above Sweatshops: Innovative Approaches to Global Labor Challenges

Rising above Sweatshops: Innovative Approaches to Global Labor Challenges

Synopsis

Introduces the current global labor milieu and showcases innovative solutions via original case studies.

Excerpt

When the editors first asked me what I thought about the findings described in this book, all I could think of was the old adage “It’s like arguing against clean water!” Coming up with reasons why a major corporation conducting its business internationally wouldn’t want to do “good” things for all its workers and for the communities in which they work is like arguing against clean water. “Who wouldn’t want clean water?” I queried. “In fact,” I remember saying, “what business leader, knowing the water isn’t clean (and who doesn’t have the resources to make it so), would buy it—at any price?” in other words, doing good is a pretty obvious objective and why would a business leader be involved in something that wasn’t?

Since then, I’ve been thinking.

Globalization has shattered the traditional corporate governance paradigm that American companies used during the post-World War II period to organize themselves for growth and prosperity. Gone are the days when companies could point solely to their share price and P/E ratio as the primary measure or bases for success. the bar that defines corporate reputation has been fundamentally raised. Corporate integrity is no longer about simply obeying the law or meeting legal minimums. a company’s obligations now extend beyond mere compliance with regulation or not running afoul of enforcement agencies. Measuring “reputational capital” in the United States and abroad has become an extraordinarily complex exercise involving numerous transnational and other interests over which global companies have little or no direct control.

The global corporate governance movement is beginning to coalesce around a new paradigm that describes how companies must organize for . . .

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