The Struggle in Black and Brown: African American and Mexican American Relations during the Civil Rights Era

The Struggle in Black and Brown: African American and Mexican American Relations during the Civil Rights Era

The Struggle in Black and Brown: African American and Mexican American Relations during the Civil Rights Era

The Struggle in Black and Brown: African American and Mexican American Relations during the Civil Rights Era

Synopsis

It might seem that African Americans and Mexican Americans would have common cause in matters of civil rights. This volume, which considers relations between blacks and browns during the civil rights era, carefully examines the complex and multifaceted realities that complicate such assumptions - and that revise our view of both the civil rights struggle and black-brown relations in recent history. Unique in its focus, innovative in its methods, and broad in its approach to various locales and time periods, the book provides key perspectives to understanding the development of America's ethnic and socio-political landscape. These essays focus chiefly on the Southwest, where Mexican Americans and African Americans have had a long history of civil rights activism. Among the cases the authors take up are the unification of black and Chicano civil rights and labour groups in California; divisions between Mexican Americans and African Americans generated by the War on Poverty; and cultural connections established by black and Chicano musicians during the period. Together these cases present the first truly nuanced picture of the conflict and cooperation, goodwill and animosity, unity and disunity that played a critical role in the history of both black and brown relations and the battle for civil rights. Their insights are especially timely, as black-brown relations occupy an increasingly important role in America's public life.

Excerpt

In October 1967 a large group of Mexican American and African American activists met in Albuquerque, New Mexico for the annual conference of the Alianza Federal de Pueblos Libres. Called together by Alianza leader and New Mexican activist Reies López Tijerina, the meeting explored the possibility of black and Chicano unity and collaboration. Virtually every major Black Power organization sent a representative: Ron Karenga of the Us organization, James Dennis of the Congress of Racial Equality, Ralph Featherstone of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, Walter Bremond of the Black Congress, and Anthony Akku Babu of the Black Panther Party. The most important Chicano groups also sent leaders to the gathering. These included Tijerina, José Angel Gutiérrez of the Mexican American Youth Organization, Bert Corona of the Mexican American Political Association, David Sánchez of the Brown Berets, and Rodolfo “Corky” Gonzáles of the Crusade for Justice. Never before in the history of the African American and Mexican American freedom struggles had so many activists from so many different civil rights groups met in an attempt to forge a cooperative, cross-racial alliance. Blacks and . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.