Between Movement and Establishment: Organizations Advocating for Youth

Between Movement and Establishment: Organizations Advocating for Youth

Between Movement and Establishment: Organizations Advocating for Youth

Between Movement and Establishment: Organizations Advocating for Youth

Synopsis

This pathbreaking book examines the strategies, successes, and challenges of youth advocacy organizations, highlighting the importance of local contexts for these efforts. Working between social movements and the political establishment, these organizations occupy a special niche in American politics and civil society. They use their position to change local agendas for youth and public perceptions of youth, and work to strengthen local community support systems.

Between Movement and Establishment describes how youth advocacy organizations affect change in a fragmented urban policy environment. It considers the different constituencies that organizations target, including public officials and policies, specific service sectors, and community members, and looks at the multiple tactics advocates employ to advance their reform agendas, such as political campaigns, accountability measures, building civic capacity, research, and policy formation. This work further examines the importance of historical, organizational, and political contexts in explaining the strategies, actions, and consequences of advocacy organizations' efforts at the local level, bringing to light what is effective and why.

Excerpt

Organizations that advocate for urban youth can play a critical role for this vulnerable population. Youth growing up in the nation’s big cities confront the same developmental tasks as do American youth everywhere. They must acquire the social skills, personal attitudes, and intellectual competencies that will carry them to successful adulthood. But too many urban youth must accomplish these goals in the context of deeply flawed institutions. the child poverty rate in the nation’s large cities stands at 26 percent, well above the national child poverty rate of 17 percent, and 45 percent of urban youth live in families where no parent has full-time, year-round employment (Annie E. Casey Foundation 2004). Other markers of institutional dysfunction signal particular challenges facing youth living in America’s largest cities. Urban students are two times more likely to drop out of school than are youth in other settings. Urban youth pay a “health tax” in terms of disproportionately high rates of asthma and of lead and asbestos poisoning; they have limited access to health care. Moreover, urban youth contending with these disadvantages must do so in settings that are often made unsafe by gangs and drugs. Urban youth are more likely than nonurban youth to spend time in the foster care and juvenile justice systems or to live in zero-parent families. Data on every measure of child well-being—poverty, education, family supports, health, teen pregnancies, teen death rate, housing—indicate that too many young people living in America’s large cities lack the opportunities and resources they need to become successful workers, parents and citizens (Annie E. Casey 2004, 2008; National Research Council and Institute of Medicine 2002).

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.