Global Citizenship and the University: Advancing Social Life and Relations in an Interdependent World

Global Citizenship and the University: Advancing Social Life and Relations in an Interdependent World

Global Citizenship and the University: Advancing Social Life and Relations in an Interdependent World

Global Citizenship and the University: Advancing Social Life and Relations in an Interdependent World

Synopsis

With the increasing integration of global economies and societies, the nation-state is no longer the sole force shaping and defining citizenship. New ideas of global citizenship are emerging, and universities, which are increasingly involved in international engagements, provide a unique opportunity to explore how fundamental understandings of modern citizenship are changing.

Drawing on case studies of universities in China, the United States, Hungary, and Argentina, "Global Citizenship and the University" moves beyond a narrow political definition of citizenship to address the cultural and economic complexities of contemporary social life. Rhoads and Szel(r)nyi show how universities should be mindful of the possibilities for faculty and student involvement in the production, management, and application of knowledge, and how this in turn allows for an engagement as citizens that reflects serious considerations of the global context. Ultimately, the authors challenge universities and readers alike to consider the many transnational opportunities that are redefining citizenship today.

Excerpt

Globalization is not a recent phenomenon. The influence of individuals and groups on others has steadily increased throughout human history, reaching a point some five hundred years ago that could reasonably be described as “global” in nature. As means of transportation advanced over time, so did the power of one society to influence another. This was becoming increasingly evident by the sixteenth century with the rise of the great European powers and their ability to dominate parts of nearly every region of the world. Arguably, the origins of globalization are located in this period, for it marked the rise of the great navies, global shipping and trade industries, extensive transoceanic migration, and, of course, expansive colonization by Europeans.

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