Growing an Entrepreneurial Business: Concepts and Cases

Growing an Entrepreneurial Business: Concepts and Cases

Growing an Entrepreneurial Business: Concepts and Cases

Growing an Entrepreneurial Business: Concepts and Cases

Synopsis

Growing an Entrepreneurial Business: Concepts and Cases is a textbook designed for courses that focus on managing small to medium sized enterprises. It focuses on the major management challenges that successful start-ups encounter when leaders decide to grow and scale their businesses.

The book is divided into two parts- text and cases- to provide professors with maximum flexibility in organizing their courses. The thirty-five cases can be used in conjunction with the text, or independently. Twelve cases are written as narratives with multiple teaching points, but without a focus on a particular business decision; the remaining twenty-three cases were written around specific conundrums related to strategy, operations, finance, marketing, leadership, culture, human resources, organizational design, business model, and growth. Discussion questions are provided for each case.

The text portion of the book discusses key issues derived from the author's research and consulting, and is meant to complement the case method of teaching, raising issues for conversation. In addition to the real-world knowledge that students will derive from the cases, readers will take away research-based templates and models that they can use in developing or consulting with small businesses.

Excerpt

This book is designed for courses that explore entrepreneurship beyond the start-up phase, as well as for classes in managing small businesses. Its focus is on the common issues faced by businesses as they attempt to scale.

I have spent much of my non-academic career representing growth companies like those discussed in the cases, as a lawyer, an investment banker, or a strategy consultant. And now, my interest in growth companies has carried over into my academic research and teaching at the Darden Graduate School of Business. As a result, this book draws on both practical experience and academic research. All of the theories and many of the cases have been used in my own course, Managing Smaller Enterprises.

The book is divided into two parts—text and cases—to provide professors maximum flexibility in customizing course content. The thirty-three cases can be used in conjunction with the text or independent of it. Eleven cases were written as narratives with many teaching points but without a focused decision or conundrum. The remaining twenty-two cases were written to require students to make and defend business decisions. The case portion of the book contains discussion questions for each case and a matrix (table) that indicates which cases cover key issues that users (professors and students alike) may wish to explore.

The text portion of the book discusses key issues derived from research and consulting, and is meant to accompany the case method of teaching, raising issues for conversation and an exchange of views. It does not provide a comprehensive review of the literature or a discussion of all issues facing growing businesses. Rather, the text is focused on enabling classroom conversations about key issues for small firms that are aiming to grow. Questions are provided to stimulate reflective thought and . . .

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