Reading Colonial Japan: Text, Context, and Critique

Reading Colonial Japan: Text, Context, and Critique

Reading Colonial Japan: Text, Context, and Critique

Reading Colonial Japan: Text, Context, and Critique

Synopsis

The Japanese empire lasted from 1869 to 1945 and reigned as the only non-western colonial power of the 20th century. Impacting the lives of millions of Asians and Micronesians, the political, economic, and cultural ramifications of this era are still felt today.

Excerpt

By any measure, Japan’s modern empire was formidable. The only major non-Western colonial power in the twentieth century, Japan controlled a vast area of Asia and numerous archipelagos in the Pacific Ocean. Its reach extended from Sakhalin Island north of the Japanese archipelago to the Solomon Islands in the South Pacific and expanded into Manchuria, areas of China, Korea, and much of Southeast Asia and Micronesia. Over the more than seven decades of Japanese colonial rule (1869–1945), Japan successfully naturalized two colonies (Ainu Moshir/Hokkaido and the Ryukyu Kingdom/Okinawa) into its national territory. The massive extraction of resources and extensive cultural assimilation policies radically impacted the lives of millions of Asians and Pacific Islanders. The political, economic, and cultural ramifications of this era are still felt today.

Over the last thirty years, the field of Japanese studies has produced an impressive body of Japanese and English language scholarship on Japan’s colonial era. Initially, solid groundwork was laid with works elucidating economic, legal, and agricultural policies produced in the imperial center and imposed on the colonial periphery. More recently, critical work emphasizes that despite overwhelming unequal power relations, all colonial processes . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.