The Future of Transatlantic Relations: Perceptions, Policy and Practice

The Future of Transatlantic Relations: Perceptions, Policy and Practice

The Future of Transatlantic Relations: Perceptions, Policy and Practice

The Future of Transatlantic Relations: Perceptions, Policy and Practice

Synopsis

This contributed volume provides a valuable comparative examination of the state of transatlantic relations. The comparative approach utilized highlights the often understudied differences in perception and policy that exist across European and North American states towards the idea and practice of the 'transatlantic relationship'.

Excerpt

This volume has been a few years in the making and grew from a paper that the editors presented at the meeting of the Inter-University Consortium for Armed Forces and Society in Fall 2007. the paper focused on the challenges that were then facing the Transatlantic alliance. One of the audience members was Geoffrey Burn, editor at Stanford University Press, who approached us about the possibility of expanding some of those ideas as the basis for an edited volume. the concept he presented to us, and that we wholeheartedly supported, was to enlist scholars and country specialists on both sides of the Atlantic to write chapters that focused on a number of themes, but from the perspective of the specific country. the themes would be introduced at the beginning of the volume, with conclusions drawn at the end based on what each of the chapters stressed. We thought that this would be a very realistic approach for an edited volume, especially when there seemed to be so much turmoil among the partners on both sides of the Atlantic.

We worked closely with Geoffrey to outline a time line, and then used the annual meetings of both the International Studies Association (ISA) and American Political Science Association (APSA) as benchmarks to have chapters drafted and as the basis for discussion. Both organizations were helpful in giving us panel time; Jeanne White of isa also provided space for the group to meet so that we had a quiet place to develop our ideas and review our thoughts after our panel. As we discovered, this approach of presenting . . .

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