Transnational Crossroads: Remapping the Americas and the Pacific

Transnational Crossroads: Remapping the Americas and the Pacific

Transnational Crossroads: Remapping the Americas and the Pacific

Transnational Crossroads: Remapping the Americas and the Pacific

Synopsis

The twentieth century was a time of unprecedented migration and interaction for Asian, Latin American, and Pacific Islander cultures in the Americas and the American Pacific. Some of these ethnic groups already had historic ties, but technology, migration, and globalization during the twentieth century brought them into even closer contact. Transnational Crossroads explores and triangulates for the first time the interactions and contacts among these three cultural groups that were brought together by the expanding American empire from 1867 to 1950. Through a comparative framework, this volume weaves together narratives of U.S. and Spanish empire, globalization, resistance, and identity, as well as social, labour, and political movements. Contributors examine multiethnic celebrities and key figures, migratory paths, cultural productions, and social and political formations among these three groups. Engaging multiple disciplines and methodologies, these studies of Asian American, Latin American, and Pacific Islander cultural interactions explode traditional notions of ethnic studies and introduce new approaches to transnational and comparative studies of the Americas and the American Pacific.Camilla Fojas is Vincent de Paul Professor and the director of Latin American and Latino studies at DePaul University. She is the author of Border Bandits: Hollywood on the Southern Frontier.Rudy P. Gue arra Jr. is an assistant professor of Asian Pacific American studies at Arizona State University. He is author of Becoming Mexipino: Multiethnic Identities and Communities in San Diego.

Excerpt

Camilla Fojas and Rudy P. Guevarra Jr.

Transnational Crossroads explores the contact among Asian, Latina/o, and Pacific Islander cultures and communities in the Americas and the American Pacific that is apparent in key figures, migratory paths, cultural productions, and social and political formations. Perhaps the most infamous example of this transcultural contact is that of Alberto Fujimori, the former president of Peru, who maintains strong ties to Japan and Latin America, evinced by his dual Peruvian and Japanese citizenship. After leaving his self-imposed exile in Japan in 2000, Fujimori was extradited from Chile to Peru, where in April 2009 he was sentenced to twenty-five years in prison after being found guilty of ordering massacres and kidnappings during his tenure as commander in chief. Although the victims’ families and human rights groups around the world celebrated his sentencing, it was not without conflict, for Fujimori is still revered by many Peruvians for his legacy in bringing the country out of near economic and political collapse and for his role in subduing the leftist guerrilla group El Sendero Luminoso, the Shining Path; in fact hundreds of Fujimori supporters, or fujimoristas, took to the streets to protest his sentence, and his closest ally, his daughter Keiko, once a congresswoman in Peru, was narrowly defeated in the 2011 run-off election for the presidency.

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