A Glossary of Cognitive Linguistics

A Glossary of Cognitive Linguistics

A Glossary of Cognitive Linguistics

A Glossary of Cognitive Linguistics

Synopsis

Cognitive linguistics is one of the most rapidly expanding schools in linguistics with, by now, an impressive and complex technical vocabulary. This alphabetic guide gives an up-to-date introduction to the key terms in cognitive linguistics, covering all the major theories, approaches, ideas and many of the relevant theoretical constructs. The Glossary also features a brief introduction to cognitive linguistics, a detailed annotated reading list and a listing of some of the key researchers in cognitive linguistics. The Glossary can be used as a companion volume to Cognitive Linguistics, by Vyvyan Evans and Melanie Green, or as a stand-alone introduction to cognitive linguistics and its two hitherto best developed sub-branches: cognitive semantics, and cognitive approaches to grammar. Key features:
• A handy and easily understandable pocket guide for anyone embarking on courses in cognitive linguistics, and language and mind.
• Supplies numerous cross-references to related terms.
• Includes coverage of newer areas such as Radical Construction Grammar, Embodied Construction Grammar, Primary Metaphor Theory and Principled Polysemy.

Excerpt

Cognitive linguistics is a modern school of linguistic thought that originally emerged in the early 1970s. It is also firmly rooted in the emergence of modern cognitive science in the 1960s and 1970s, particularly in work relating to human categorisation, and in earlier traditions such as Gestalt psychology. Cognitive linguistics is primarily concerned with investigating the relationship between language, the mind and socio-physical experience. the earliest pioneers in cognitive linguistics were responding, in part, to dissatisfaction with formal approaches to language. Early research, especially in the 1970s, was dominated by a relatively small group of scholars based on the western seaboard of the United States. During the 1980s, cognitive linguistic research began to take root in northern continental Europe, particularly in Belgium, Holland and Germany. By the early 1990s, there was a growing proliferation of research in cognitive linguistics throughout Europe and North America, and a relatively large internationally distributed group of researchers who identified themselves as ‘cognitive linguists’. in 1989/1990, the International Cognitive Linguistics Society was established, together with the journal Cognitive Linguistics. in the words of Ronald Langacker ([1991] 2002: xv), this ‘marked the birth of cognitive linguistics as a broadly grounded, self conscious . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.