Patterns in Child Phonology

Patterns in Child Phonology

Patterns in Child Phonology

Patterns in Child Phonology

Synopsis

An advanced introduction to the acquisition of phonology and the first textbook on normal (non-disordered) phonological acquisition. This book steers readers toward an investigation of the extent to which theories of speech production explains recurring sound patterns in child language and introduces perceptual aspects of acquisition. Patterns in Child Phonology guides the reader in advancing the observational skills of phonological analyses and in asking important questions in the field of phonological acquisition. This student-friendly textbook includes definitions of phonological terms and concepts and covers child phonological patterns, phonological theory, the pre-production stages of phonological acquisition, non-grammatical factors affecting acquisition, and an overview of issues in phonological acquisition. Applicable to students of all disciplines.

Excerpt

Phonological acquisition and development in children has long been the object of research, considered from various theoretical and disciplinary perspectives. Child data have been called upon to lend weight to claims of naturalness being attributed to various linguistic theories, however, these various perspectives have not been brought together before.

Our aim in this book is to present an overview of patterns observed in the development of phonology. The intention is to give pointers to the issues that arise in the study of phonological acquisition. We have concentrated on normal acquisition and have avoided, as much as possible, delayed or disordered speech, although there are studies using data from children with delayed acquisition which parallel, at a later age, the paths followed by normally acquiring children and, therefore, present useful confirmation of some of the patterns we have discussed. We also believe that a knowledge of what is ‘normal’ is important to those studying deviant speech. It is not in any sense a monograph, nor does it present any new research. The data we present are taken, for the most part from published material, although there are a few unpublished data included where a certain point needs to be reinforced. Certain sources, in particular Smith (1973) have been heavily plundered because of their richness and we are grateful to those who have contributed so generously to the overall stock of data available. Others have provided fewer data but have, nevertheless, helped to enrich our examples. Because the main focus of studies is on Indo-European languages, in particular English, there is a heavy concentration on these languages to the exclusion of those languages that have been neglected or only very cursorily studied. Except in the first chapter, the children in question are named, some by their full name (or pseudonym) and others are identified just by initials. Nevertheless, in all cases it is possible to develop a familiarity with subjects. The reader is encouraged to return to original sources to confirm the information we have provided.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.