The Cocaine War: Drugs, Politics, and the Environment

The Cocaine War: Drugs, Politics, and the Environment

The Cocaine War: Drugs, Politics, and the Environment

The Cocaine War: Drugs, Politics, and the Environment

Synopsis

The Cocaine War uncovers the geopolitical interests behind the US "War on Drugs" in Latin America, and spells out just what the drug war means: the danger it poses to the political stability of weak democracies, human rights and development, and its environmental impact. This book is a rare opportunity for English-speakers to hear the other side of this contentious issue. Boville explores in depth the relationship between the United States and Latin America, explaining the political need of the US government to develop a useful tool to extend American authority after the Cold War. Belin Boville is a Spanish journalist working in Latin America.

Excerpt

While the younger generation was nursing a hang-over from the free and creative scene in the late 1980s, we began to feel the effects of a dual process that ten years later would place us smack dab in the middle of globalization. On the one hand, we saw the puritan neo-liberalism that first cropped up under Reagan had caused the traffic in of all sorts of goods to spread worldwide; on the other hand we witnessed the fall of communist societies, accompanied by the proliferation and consolidation of criminal organizations during the transition to savage capitalism.

Contrary to the popular paradigm, we saw proof at every hand that this is an inter-dependent world characterized by a range of economic, social and environmental problems more than by any one political ideology. Thus a period began which demanded an extraordinary effort from all of us: faced with the free competition of the markets (for both job and goods), there was more pressure, more stress (environmental and personal) and more competition among individuals, and companies, and countries.

At the end of the 1980s all of these complex relationships were more obvious than ever, and young people watched, bewildered, as consumer products multiplied vertiginously — including drugs, which were very much in demand in a heterogeneous society in need of escape . . .

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