Gang Nation: Delinquent Citizens in Puerto Rican, Chicano, and Chicana Narratives

Gang Nation: Delinquent Citizens in Puerto Rican, Chicano, and Chicana Narratives

Gang Nation: Delinquent Citizens in Puerto Rican, Chicano, and Chicana Narratives

Gang Nation: Delinquent Citizens in Puerto Rican, Chicano, and Chicana Narratives

Synopsis

In Gang Nation, Monica Brown explores how Latino gang culture mirrors the most destructive aspects of the American Dream through a look at novels and memoirs.

Excerpt

Since the 1840s when tough young Irishmen invented the modern street gang
in the slums of the Bowery, Five Points and Paradise Alley (making the Bowery
boys and the Dead Rabbits just as dreaded as the Crips and Bloods are today),
gang bonding has been a family for the forgotten, a total solidarity (like national
or religious fervor) closing out other empathies and transmuting self-hatred into
tribal rage.

—Mike Davis, City of Quartz

Gangs are no accident; our society inadvertently produced them, and they will
not decline as a social problem until we confront our relationship to them. And
to confront our relationship to street gangs is to come face-to-face with some
well-entrenched self-interests that also are important to understanding our
selves. Gangs have a social context, and … the context is us.

—Malcolm W. Klein, The American Street Gang

In late spring, the beginning of the new millennium, the temperatures are climbing into the hundred-and-teens in the desert. I follow daily the events in southern Arizona where armed ranchers are “hunting” illegal aliens crossing the border into their land. With the desert conditions, the ranchers have help. 3 June 2000: Today I read of more dead . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.