Atlantis: The Evidence of Science

Atlantis: The Evidence of Science

Atlantis: The Evidence of Science

Atlantis: The Evidence of Science

Excerpt

I would not consider myself justified in inflicting another book on Atlantis on the public were it not for the fact that over the past few decades, and even within the last few years, tantalizing new evidence has appeared which, though well-enough known within the relevant scholarly disciplines, is not yet widely known outside. I must confess that before the appearance of this evidence I myself was a skeptic. To me, Atlantis was best left alone, the preserve of the “lunatic fringe” who have, over the past few decades, filled the libraries and bookshops with their wild speculations, placing the Lost Island everywhere from Antarctica and the Pacific to the Moon and Mars. A major source of my skepticism was the knowledge that continents or continent-sized landmasses cannot sink into the ocean — not without destroying the entire human race, at least. Yet the weight of the new evidence, which curiously enough seems to have largely escaped the attention of the “Atlantean” enthusiasts, is such that it caused this skeptic to reconsider. It is, as we shall see, material which simultaneously solves the problem of the so-called “Lost Continent” and casts a dramatic new light on every aspect of the whole question, opening before us fresh and astonishing vistas.

The most important facet of the new evidence involves the question of transatlantic contact.

One of the central tenets of all research into Atlantis has been the proposition that in ancient times men made voyages across the Atlantic, and the Old and New Worlds interacted with each other: This because Plato had placed Atlantis “opposite the Pillars of Hercules” (Gibraltar) and mentioned a string of islands leading from Atlantis to the “opposite continent.” This has been taken to be the . . .

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