The Making of the Slave Class

The Making of the Slave Class

The Making of the Slave Class

The Making of the Slave Class

Synopsis

You can only be a king if you have many peasants. You can only have the super-rich if you have many who are poor. And this is the basis for class. Not that long ago the head of the Mormon Church summarized what many American's believe or at least subconsciously accept when he said, "There is a reason why one man is born white rich and with many blessings and another is born black with very few, God has determined each man's proper reward." And while he was widely and deservedly criticized for his remarks, it wasn't because a majority does not believe his views, but rather that they deemed him politically incorrect for brining race into the question and for saying aloud what many think quietly and keep to themselves. Class is America's forbidden thought. Class and culture rigidly control who we are, who we associate with, and how much money we can earn. American class culture determines who will prosper and who will fail. 'The Making of the Slave Class' is a book about this culture and the debilitating consequences that make the American slave class. This is a personal story of the author's working class and early life in poverty combined with very readable treatment of the American class system written for a general audience. This book is the first historical and cultural analysis of the American class system and the poverty it creates.

Excerpt

Perhaps you may be offended by the premise of this book: that there is an American slave class, and that it is caused by our culture, particularly by our Christian culture, and by government policies that insure its continued existence. As the author, all I ask is that you read this book before making any judgment.

In addition there are some who may be outraged by the use of the word “slave” and the phrase “slave class,” believing that these somehow belittle the brutality of pre-Civil War slavery. This book makes no such comparison. Slavery has many forms, some more brutal than others. And while some of the most brutal acts of American slavery occurred before the Civil War, these acts do not excuse or lessen the brutality committed on the current slave class, which includes but is not limited to many of the heirs of those pre-Civil War slaves.

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