The United Nations: States vs International Laws

The United Nations: States vs International Laws

The United Nations: States vs International Laws

The United Nations: States vs International Laws

Synopsis

Few Americans understand why the United Nations functions the way it does, and why it seems so ineffectual in facing catastrophes like those in the former Yugoslavia, East Timor, and Palestine/Israel. The author traces its weaknesses to its founding, and

Excerpt

The United Nations has had either a bad press or no press in the US media. As a result, Americans who read only the mainstream newspapers and the conventional magazines, and who listen only to the major television and radio programs, are misinformed or uninformed as to why the UN does what it is reputed to do, or fails to do what it is expected to do. This volume points out that the United Nations structure was basically US designed at Dumbarton Oaks in 1944. The UN functions the way it does because American leaders planned it that way. The League of Nations was rejected by the Senate Republican leadership in 1919; to avoid a repeat of that rejection and to win the approval of the Senate Republicans in 1945, the United States required that the UN be given only limited powers. Five nations (China, Soviet Union, France, United Kingdom, and the US) gave themselves the right to issue a veto in the Security Council (where votes really matter) so that they would always be able to reject any action that was not in their own interests. Further, the US leaders claimed that resolutions of the General Assembly were “mere recommendations” which could be ignored without the nation being accused of flouting a UN proposal. The UN was created without an army, without the “power of the purse,” and with an International Court from which nations could, at their pleasure, claim immunity.

The founders were so determined to create a UN which would never be able to challenge their sovereignty that UN peacekeepers were prevented from coming to the rescue of a population suffering starvation, persecution, disease, illiteracy, and poverty unless the nation where the suffering existed invited them . . .

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