A Guide to Speech Production and Perception

A Guide to Speech Production and Perception

A Guide to Speech Production and Perception

A Guide to Speech Production and Perception

Synopsis

What roles do the speaker and the listener play in communication processes? Providing an overall system view, this innovative textbook explains how those working in the area think about speech. Emphasising contextual and environmental perspectives, Tatham and Morton lead you through classical and modern phonetics alongside discussion of cognitive and biological aspects of speech. In explaining speech production-for-perception and the relationship between phonology and phonetics, this book shows the possible applications (such as language teaching, clinical practice, and speech technology) and how these are relevant to other disciplines, including sociolinguistics, cognitive neuroscience, psychology and speech acoustics. Key Features
• Definition and Explanation boxes throughout the text to help you understand key terms and concepts
• Tutorial sections in each chapter provide opportunities for you to expand or reinforce your learning
• Encourages you to develop understanding of theoretical applications through explanation of traditional and contemporary theories
• Evaluation sections enable you to compare the pros and cons of competing theories

Excerpt

There are changes taking place in how speech and language research and teaching are handled in our universities and other higher education institutions in the UK, the USA and mainland Europe. What seems to be happening is a drawing out of a differentiation along academic lines, recognising an ‘arts’ element in, say, phonetics for language study (in language departments), but in addition a renewed and considerable emphasis on psychology, cognitive processing and cognitive modelling (in psychology departments), a firm recognition of the formal need for this area in speech technology (in engineering and computer science departments), and in particular a more formal structure to the area in departments dealing with the rapidly expanding area of studies in speech and language disorders. What we believe this means is a movement forward from a somewhat vague notion of ‘speech and language’ towards a clear understanding of the interrelated subdivisions within the field, and their importance within specific disciplines for both research and teaching. We are already seeing the beginnings of some restructuring to take account of this shift in viewpoint.

The subject of speech production and perception is vast, and this book is not about what do to when studying the area, or indeed how to do it. Our objective is to explain to the reader how people working in the area think about speech. We aim to provide a guide to the complexities of the field for learners and researchers, showing how a modern, unified approach is productive in understanding not just the discipline itself but its potential for enlightened application in neighbouring areas.

This is a textbook, but it is not a page-by-page description of speech production and perception. It is a reference textbook – one where you consult here and there, not one where you start at the beginning and go on to the end; though you can do that if you want to without things going wrong. There are two major classes of student the book is aimed at: those who have a background in phonetics and/or linguistics and who are going on to intermediate or advanced study, and those who are relatively proficient in another discipline – psychology, neuroscience, clinical studies, speech technology, etc. – and who need to understand something of how those of us who work in speech studies think.

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