The Manager's Pocket Calculator: A Quick Guide to Essential Business Formulas and Ratios

The Manager's Pocket Calculator: A Quick Guide to Essential Business Formulas and Ratios

The Manager's Pocket Calculator: A Quick Guide to Essential Business Formulas and Ratios

The Manager's Pocket Calculator: A Quick Guide to Essential Business Formulas and Ratios

Synopsis

Your success or failure is reflected in one number: the bottom line. So you'd better get a handle on the numbers that influence it. The Manager's Pocket Calculator gives you the essentials of budgeting and forecasting, financial analysis, reporting, interest and rate-of-return calculation, statistics, and more.

Not just an overview, the book contains more than 100 formulas and ratios with numerical examples, spreadsheet entries, and step-by-step calculations. The Manager's Pocket Calculator trains you in the application of mission-critical business fundamentals, better preparing you to:

• Create and justify budgets

• Excel in planning meetings concerning financial performance

• Craft reports and presentations demonstrating financial outcomes

• Communicate with internal and external accounting, auditing and other financial entities

An indispensable, everyday business tool, The Manager's Pocket Calculator makes you more than a manager. It makes you a powerful architect of your organization's financial stability.

Excerpt

It’s all in the numbers. Everyone has heard this statement and it is true. Your performance is invariably judged by how much profit you create or by how much cost you incur in your segment, team, or department. The so-called bottom line—profit or loss—is the universal means for monitoring performance and for determining whether an initiative was worthwhile.

With the dominance of the bottom line in every aspect of how your performance is graded, you have a distinct advantage if you are skilled at conveying information in terms of profitability. Conversely, you are at a distinct disadvantage if you cannot communicate the profit or loss aspects of your work to management. On a most basic level, just asking management for something is less effective than demonstrating how an approval is going to create additional profits or cut costs (related directly to revenues) and expenses (overhead, not related directly to revenues). This is the rudimentary distinction between managers with communication skills and those who struggle every day trying to find the best way to communicate what they know and what they have achieved.

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