Interactive Music Therapy in Child and Family Psychiatry: Clinical Practice, Research, and Teaching

Interactive Music Therapy in Child and Family Psychiatry: Clinical Practice, Research, and Teaching

Interactive Music Therapy in Child and Family Psychiatry: Clinical Practice, Research, and Teaching

Interactive Music Therapy in Child and Family Psychiatry: Clinical Practice, Research, and Teaching

Synopsis

This practical book explains the rationale for using music therapy in child and family psychiatry. Oldfield reflects on current research methodology and describes characteristics of her own approach to therapy sessions, including how to start and end the session, how to motivate children and establish a positive musical dialogue with them, and how to include parents in the session. She also uses video analysis techniques to assess and advance the role of the therapist. Chapters focus on the results of the author's research investigations with specific groups such as mothers and young children, groups of adults with profound difficulties, children with autistic spectrum disorder or physical and mental difficulties, as well as children without clear diagnosis. Case studies and vignettes supplement these examples. The author also considers the whole process from the initial referral for therapy and using psychiatric music therapy for diagnostic assessment to how to end treatment.

Excerpt

Music therapists should come with a government health warning: This therapist may seriously change the way you see the world! In this regard, Amelia Oldfield would certainly be a high-risk therapist. In this delightfully straightforward and readable book, Amelia describes her interactive music therapy approach and how this is applied in the many varied aspects of her work. Her writing, like its author, is personal and approachable; accessible to both therapists and non-therapists alike.

I have worked with Amelia at the Croft Child and Family Unit since 1998. Until taking up my post in the unit my exposure to the creative therapies had been limited. Since then I have had the privilege of learning from Amelia and her music therapy colleagues the invaluable contribution that music therapy can make in an intensive child and adolescent mental health setting.

The Croft Unit is a residential mental health unit providing intensive assessment and treatment for children and families living in the East Anglian region of the UK. Most of the children attending the unit have severe and complex difficulties in multiple areas. These may include problems with emotion regulation and expression, learning difficulties, poor attention and impaired socio-communication skills. These children challenge both families and professionals by the breadth and variability of their difficulties.

During an admission it is vital that we see children and their families in a variety of settings so that we can identify areas of strength as well as difficulty Over years I have noted that the children (and their parents) often display quite different aspects of this profile within the music therapy setting.

For very many children, music making is the highlight of their week, an opportunity to have fun and explore a different world. For children with speech and language problems it can be a rare chance to communicate . . .

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