Ortega's "The Revolt of the Masses" and the Triumph of the New Man

Ortega's "The Revolt of the Masses" and the Triumph of the New Man

Ortega's "The Revolt of the Masses" and the Triumph of the New Man

Ortega's "The Revolt of the Masses" and the Triumph of the New Man

Excerpt

T. S. Eliot begins his introduction to Josef Pieper’s seminal work Leisure: The Basis of Culture by invoking the contemporary state of philosophy. Eliot, who is hardly a new comer to the discipline, frames the question in a manner that takes into consideration technical matters and where this venerable discipline found itself during the middle of the twentieth century. But more importantly, Eliot addresses the fundamental question of temperament and philosophical vocation. He looks to an ideal time when the day will dawn again when a philosopher will come forth “whose writings, lectures and personality will arouse the imagination.” But even more relevant to our present condition, Eliot explains, is that philosophy must begin again to exercise its former, more meaningful etymology — “the need for new authority to express insight and wisdom.”

It was not many years later that several such figures would begin to make headway in at least some of Eliot’s prescribed categories: Sartre, Camus, Marcel and Jaspers come to mind as embodying . . .

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