World Heritage Monuments and Related Edifices in India

World Heritage Monuments and Related Edifices in India

World Heritage Monuments and Related Edifices in India

World Heritage Monuments and Related Edifices in India

Excerpt

In July of every year UNESCO (the United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization) designates a number of manmade monuments and natural wonders as World Heritage Monuments, selected under the advice of experts and critics from a list proposed by each member nation. The selection is based on both the cultural value and the universal appeal of the monuments, which are open to all humanity. UNESCO provides technical advice for monument maintenance and upkeep.

Solitary monuments may be selected or a group of monuments in a given location. As of 2003, there were twenty-three such monuments in India, including six natural wonders, one prehistoric site at Bhimbetka, and three Buddhist groups of monuments at Bodh Gaya, Sanchi and Ajanta. Others include Ellora, with a group of monuments constructed by Buddhists, Hindus and Jains, and seven Hindu sites with one monument each at Elephanta, Tanjur, Konark and four groups of monuments at Patadkal, Mamalapurum, Khajuraho and Vijayanagara. Delhi and Agra have two Muslim monuments each and a group of monuments are found at Fatahpursikiri. A group of Christian monuments is located at Goa. Some noteworthy monuments have not yet made the list, possibly due to restricted public entry which makes their study difficult for non-Hindu specialists.

There is an enormous wealth of sculpture in India, and the selected monuments present the best of Indian sculpture, art and architecture over a period of time. A comparative study of these monuments reveals the developmental history of India’s religious monuments. This book presents all the manmade World Heritage Monuments (selected up to 2003) and related edifices in surrounding areas. It should be noted that since then, two Cola temples in south India, Victoria Railway Terminus at Mumbai and an archeological site in Rajasthan were added to the list. These monuments are not included in the book.

In order to highlight the major changes that have taken place, the monuments are classified in this book as early, early medieval, middle medieval, late medieval and recent. An outstanding monument in a group at one place typically incorporates attractive . . .

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