Music, Sound and Multimedia: From the Live to the Virtual

Music, Sound and Multimedia: From the Live to the Virtual

Music, Sound and Multimedia: From the Live to the Virtual

Music, Sound and Multimedia: From the Live to the Virtual

Synopsis

This new series aims to explore the area of "screen music". Volume topics will include multimedia music, music and television, Hollywood film music, and the music of Bollywood cinema.Music and other sound effects have been central to a whole host of media forms throughout the twentieth century, either as background, accompaniment, or main driving force. Such interactions will continue to mutate in new directions, with the widespread growth of digital technologies. Despite the expansion of research into the use of music and sound in film, the investigation of sonic interactions with other media forms has been a largely under-researched area. Music, Sound and Multimedia provides a unique study of how music and other sounds play a central part in our understandings and uses of a variety of communications media. It focuses on four areas of sound and music within broader multimedia forms - music videos, video game music, performance and presentation, and production and consumption - and addresses the centrality of such aural concerns within our everyday experiences. Charting historical developments, mapping contemporary patterns, and speculating on future possibilities, this book is essential for courses on sound and media within media and communications studies, cultural studies and popular music studies.Key features
• Charts a number of key developments in music and multimedia interactions
• Provides both historical overviews and theoretical analyses
• Features a number of in-depth case studies of important issues.

Excerpt

Jamie Sexton

Critical analysis of music has been dominated by a focus on sonic matter as a unitary object of analysis. In other words, music is predominantly appreciated as a singular media experience, separated from other media forms, which it may often interact with. To some extent, this approach decontextualises and idealises musical matter. Whilst it has been common to contextualise music culturally and historically - as interacting with the social and as emerging out of cultural traditions - it has not been so frequently analysed in its materiality, in terms of the ways it is transmitted and received, and how it often intersects with other media modes. A core reason for this general analytic trend is that, in order to understand music properly and take it seriously, critics have tended to demarcate it from other media. Understandable though such an approach is, it has led to a relative lack of scrutiny of music’s incorporation into broader media forms. I don’t want to overstate such neglect: there is plenty of work now being produced on the role of music and other sounds within films, as well as the intersection of audio-vision within music videos. Nevertheless, audio interactions with other media forms have only been partially explored. And, as digital technologies feed into what has generally been referred to as a converging mediascape, the need to address the myriad ways in which sonic matter interacts with other media becomes increasingly pressing.

As I have indicated, the tendency to idealise music is not totally widespread, although musical analysis will often downplay how sounds interact with their material conditions of transmission/reception. Such interactions, however, can deeply influence how sonic matter is perceived, and can thus constitute . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.