Quality of Life, Balance of Power and Nuclear Weapons: A Statistical Yearbook for Statesmen and Citizens 2012

Quality of Life, Balance of Power and Nuclear Weapons: A Statistical Yearbook for Statesmen and Citizens 2012

Quality of Life, Balance of Power and Nuclear Weapons: A Statistical Yearbook for Statesmen and Citizens 2012

Quality of Life, Balance of Power and Nuclear Weapons: A Statistical Yearbook for Statesmen and Citizens 2012

Excerpt

This statistical annual presents fundamental data in three sections: (1) Quality of Life, (2) Balance of Powers, (3) Developed Market Economies since 1960.

The advantage of this yearbook is that it contains data generally not available elsewhere. Sections 1 and 2 give statistics for 232 countries. By comparison, the World Bank and Encyclopedia Britannica provide statistical data for a maximum of about 160 countries. The actual number of countries in World Bank statistical tables is even smaller. The CIA World Factbook gives data for about 230 countries, but that data is limited in scope and is imprecise. Other statistical publications are even less satisfactory. I managed to increase the number of countries tallied by writing proprietary software utilizing statistical regressions, selecting data which, first of all, is important and, second, is relatively reliable, offering high correlation coefficients for these regressions.

Section 1 concentrates on data that reflect the quality of life. First, I focused on major economic and demographic indicators. In addition to data about the quality of life as measured strictly in economic terms, I sought to produce a methodologically rigorous estimate of a human rights index. The latter measures civil and political rights as well as socioeconomic rights. I also computed an integrated economicopolitical quality-of-life index.

In Section 2, the book deals with major indicators of the balance of power. In addition to data about each country’s economic power, military personnel and military expenditures, it includes data about nuclear delivery systems and provides the number of nuclear warheads of all nuclear powers. This is based on information from reputable sources. Among others, it includes estimates of the Israeli nuclear arsenal which usually do not appear in the press. I also give a rough account of countries possessing, pursuing or capable of acquiring other weapons of mass destruction. Chances are that if the American public were more familiar with these statistics, some Middle East foreign policy failures might have been avoided.

It should also be underscored that many official estimates, for example estimates of Russian military expenditures distributed by US and British intelligence . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.