Pointing at the Moon: Buddhism, Logic, Analytic Philosophy

Pointing at the Moon: Buddhism, Logic, Analytic Philosophy

Pointing at the Moon: Buddhism, Logic, Analytic Philosophy

Pointing at the Moon: Buddhism, Logic, Analytic Philosophy

Synopsis

This volume collects essays by philosophers and scholars working at the interface of Western philosophy and Buddhist Studies. Many have distinguished scholarly records in Western philosophy, with expertise in analytic philosophy and logic, as well as deep interest in Buddhist philosophy. Others have distinguished scholarly records in Buddhist Studies with strong interests in analytic philosophy and logic. All are committed to the enterprise of cross-cultural philosophy and to bringing the insights and techniques of each tradition to bear in order to illuminate problems and ideas of the other. These essays address a broad range of topics in the philosophy of mind, philosophy of language, logic, epistemology, and metaphysics, and demonstrate the fecundity of the interaction between the Buddhist and Western philosophical and logical traditions.

Excerpt

In June 2001, I was returning to Cambridge from a stint as a visiting researcher of logic and philosophy of science at the University of California, Irvine; David Lake was returning to Cambridge from a holiday in Thailand; and we met on the bus from Gatwick. the journey to Cambridge was a long one, and by its end we had started a collaboration, some of the fruits of which you hold in your hand. Dr. Lake founded the St. Luke’s Institute and invited me to be its conference director. in that capacity, I was able to organize the New Foundations seventieth anniversary meeting and a meeting on logic and rhetoric. Both of these meetings resulted in volumes which are in press as I write. the third meeting was called BILAP: Buddhism in Logic and Analytic Philosophy.

The reasons for bilap are twofold. Dr. Lake had family connections in the Far East and had spent many years there, and he was pleased to think that his philanthropy should improve appreciation in the Occident of ideas that had their genesis in the part of the world that had supplied his fortune. My reasons for wishing to organize a meeting of this kind were quite different, and I hope to explore them one day in greater detail than we have space for here. I hoped—and still hope—that what I can learn from Buddhism will help me with two particular problems that arise in Western logic and which are usually hidden away, like the first Mrs. Rochester. I refer to the problem of inexpressibility and the problem of haecceity.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.