Worldviews of Aspiring Powers: Domestic Foreign Policy Debates in China, India, Iran, Japan and Russia

Worldviews of Aspiring Powers: Domestic Foreign Policy Debates in China, India, Iran, Japan and Russia

Worldviews of Aspiring Powers: Domestic Foreign Policy Debates in China, India, Iran, Japan and Russia

Worldviews of Aspiring Powers: Domestic Foreign Policy Debates in China, India, Iran, Japan and Russia

Synopsis

Worldviews of Aspiring Powers examines the domestic foreign policy debates in five aspiring powers in Asia and Eurasia: China, India, Iran, Japan, and Russia. With chapters on each country co-authored by a U.S. scholar and an in-country expert the book identifies the most important domestic schools of thought debating national foreign policy-nationalists, realists, globalists, and idealists-and connects them to the history and institutional development of each nation. By tracking the competing schools of foreign policy thought, the volume analyzes how shifts in a domestic debate can alter a country's foreign policy and how such shifts across countries can impact relationships, especially between the aspiring powers and the United States. Worldviews of Aspiring Powers is an innovative and essential resource for students of foreign policy, international relations, comparative foreign policy, and emerging nations.

Excerpt

Henry R. Nau

The world is changing: China and other countries are rising; America may be falling. Everyone is asking: what are the likely implications? One way to answer this question is to look at how rising powers view the world and how they would like to change it. Even more interesting is to look at differing views within rising powers rather than assume that they have only one view, which is externally or structurally determined.

This study examines different domestic worldviews of foreign policy within five aspiring powers—China, India, Iran, Japan, and Russia. Power is shifting materially toward these countries. For three decades after World War ii, Japan grew faster than other developed countries. and for the past three decades, the developing or emerging countries, such as China and India, have grown faster than developed countries. Relative growth is not the only indicator of rising power, so we included Russia and Iran. And, for reasons of resources and time, we could not include other rising powers such as Brazil,Turkey, and South Africa (although we explore implications for them in our concluding chapter). Moreover, because Japan is already a “risen” power, Iran a “prospective” power, and Russia, China, and India, as this volume describes, often “conflicted” powers, unsure what the rise in power means, we refer to our five countries as “aspiring” as well as “rising” powers.

Whether the power shift toward aspiring powers is significant depends on how these powers plan to use their enhanced power. They express and . . .

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