Spanish Horror Film

Spanish Horror Film

Spanish Horror Film

Spanish Horror Film

Synopsis

The Spanish horror film is experiencing a renaissance, producing films such as Pan's Labyrinth and Aftermath. This is the first in-depth study in English of this rich cinematic tradition and the recent revival.

The book offers a detailed analysis of the work of directors such as Hesus Franco, Arnaldo de Ossorio, and Narciso Ibáñez Serrador. It also studies the production, audience and regulation of the genre, as it highlights the importance of Spanish horror film in European horror tradition and the global culture of psychotronia.

Excerpt

Contemporary contexts of horror, psychotronic and paracinema fandom in the US, UK and Spain have been crucial in the circulation and treatment of Spanish horror films past and present. As a fan, reader and consumer of American alternative publications such as The Psychotronic Encyclopedia of Film and Video Watchdog and of Spanish fanzine 2000maniacos in the early 1990s, my own positioning, taste and subcultural capital in relation to Spanish and international horror cinematic traditions and, by extension, the wider cultural field of horror are informed by paracinema and psychotronic culture. In his fan publication The Psychotronic Encyclopedia of Film (1989), Weldon described psychotronic movies as exploitation films that have been ‘treated with indifference or contempt’ by critics but that have been sought after and celebrated by fans because of their bizarreness, unclassifiability or portrayal of ‘violence, sex, noise, and often mindless escapism’ (Weldon 1989: xii). A significant number of Spanish horror films produced in the heyday of European exploitation in the late 1960s and early 1970s are included in Weldon’s global A to Z of psychotronic film, among them La residencia / The Finishing School (Narciso Ibáñez Serrador 1969), La noche de Walpurgis / The Shadow of the Werewolf (León Klimovsky 1970), La noche del terror ciego / Tombs of the Blind Dead (Amando de Ossorio 1972), Pánico en el Transiberiano / Horror Express (Eugenio Martín 1973), No profanar el sueño de los muertos / The Living Dead at Manchester Morgue (Jorge Grau 1974) and, above all, the films of the doyen of Spanish exploitation filmmaking, Jesús Franco (El secreto del Dr Orloff / Dr Jekyll’s Mistresses (1964); Drácula contra Frankenstein / The . . .

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