Medieval Education

Medieval Education

Medieval Education

Medieval Education

Synopsis

This volume offers original studies on the subject of medieval education, not only in the formal academicsense typical of schools and universities but also in a broader cultural sense that includes law, liturgy, and the new religious orders of the high Middle Ages. Its essays explore the transmission of knowledge during the middle ages in various kinds of educational communities, including schools, scriptoria, universities, and workshops.

Excerpt

The essays that make up this volume were originally delivered as lectures at the twentieth annual Medieval Studies Conference at Fordham University, held in March 2000, on “Education in the Middle Ages.” Like the conference, this book is dedicated to Father Louis B. Pascoe, S.J., for many years a professor of medieval history (now professor emeritus) at Fordham and long an inspiration to those who work in this field.

The contributions of Father Pascoe to our understanding of medieval education are well known to generations of students at Fordham. The author of books and articles on Jean Gerson and Pierre d’Ailly, Father Pascoe served on the faculty of history from 1973 and even beyond his retirement from full-time teaching in May 2000. From 1987 to 1990 he was the Chair of the History Department, and he also served as the Acting Dean of Fordham College for a year. He received his Ph.D. in History from the University of California at Los Angeles and has regularly offered graduate courses and seminars on such subjects as Medieval Church History, Medieval Universities, Medieval Monastic and Cathedral Schools, and Medieval Church and University.

In the spirit of his own wide-ranging sense of the varied aspects of education in any age but especially in the medieval period, this volume offers a number of original studies in medieval education, not only in the formal academic sense typical of schools and universities but also in a broader cultural sense that includes law, liturgy, and the new religious orders of the High Middle Ages. Curiously, the field of . . .

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