Religious Pluralism, Globalization, and World Politics

Religious Pluralism, Globalization, and World Politics

Religious Pluralism, Globalization, and World Politics

Religious Pluralism, Globalization, and World Politics

Synopsis

Globalization has spawned more active transnational religious communities, creating a powerful force in world affairs. Religious Pluralism, Globalization and World Politics, an incisive new collection of essays, explores the patterns of cooperation and conflict that mark this new religious pluralism. Shifting religious identities have encouraged interreligious dialogue and greater political engagement around global challenges including international development, conflict resolution, transitional justice, and bioethics. At the same time, interreligious competition has contributed to political conflict and running controversy over the meaning and scope of religious freedom. In this volume, leading scholars from a variety of disciplines examine how the forces of religious pluralism and globalization are playing out on the world stage.

Excerpt

>

To think religion and world politics is often to think violence. The attacks of September 11, 2001, suicide bombings in the Middle East, sectarian clashes in Kashmir, civil war in the Balkans, bloodshed in Nigeria and Indonesia—these are prominent associations. In these cases and others, links between religion and violence are not hard to find. Political commitments with divine sanction often brook no compromise. For fanatical religious minorities, violence for a higher cause has a ready-made justification. And members of the wider community who identify with the grievances of militants often lend their support, overt or tacit, to the use of force. Religion is never the sole cause of violence. It intersects in explosive ways with territorial disputes; unstable and oppressive institutions; economic and social inequalities; and ethnic, cultural, and linguistic divisions. But today as in previous eras, passionate religious identities and commitments have often served to exacerbate tensions and promote bloodshed.

Less visible, but no less significant, is the peaceful engagement of religious communities in contemporary world affairs. At a declaratory level, leaders drawn from the world’s leading religious traditions—Christian, Muslim, Jewish, Hindu, and Buddhist—have long endorsed ideals of peace, human dignity, equality, freedom, and solidarity. Today, more than at any time in history, exponents of these and other traditions are promoting conflict resolution, human rights, and economic and social development in practice—within national borders but also across them. The Good Friday agreement . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.